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stormstopper

Conference Commissioner
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stormstopper last won the day on December 26 2019

stormstopper had the most liked content!

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About stormstopper

  • Rank
    Tigerslayer, Duck Hunter
  • Birthday 06/05/1993

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    Male

CFBHC

  • Favorite Team
    Duke Blue Devils

Coaching Information

  • Offense
    15
  • Defense
    15
  • Special Teams
    9
  • Clock Mgmt
    12
  • Discipline
    12
  • Youth Mgmt
    15
  • CFBHC Career
    Kansas Jayhawks (2014-Present)
  • NFLHC Career
    Cleveland Browns Owner (2014-2016), Chicago Bears Owner/GM (2017-Present)
  • Achievements
    2x Big XII Champion (2014, 2018)
  • Feat #1
    Local Connections (1x Recruit)
  • Feat #2
    Adaptive Capabilities (Opposing Reduction)

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  1. Re-rolls for Byrd, Tanner (Sharpshooter), Davis, and Rubio table { width: 70%; border-spacing: 0; } table td { padding: 3px; } tr { background-color: #FFF; } tr:nth-child(even){ background-color: #EAEAEA; } table.boxscore tr { background-color: #fff; } table.boxscore td { font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 90%; text-align: center; border: 1px solid #D3D3D3; border-right: 0px; border-top: 0px; } table.boxscore td:first-of-type { border-left: 0px; } table.boxscore tr:first-of-type td, table.boxscore tr:last-of-type td { border-bottom: 0px; } table.compare td { font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 80%; text-align: center; } table td.block { height: 35px; text-align: center; font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 100%; background-color: #00004c; color: #fff; font-weight: bold; } table td.teamspecific { width: 49%; min-width: 400px; display:inline-block; } table td.teamspecific td.stat{ text-align: left; } table td.teamspecific td.name{ text-align: left; } table td.teamspecific td.stat.name{ width: 12%; background-color: #BBB; font-weight:bold; font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 80%; } table td.teamspecific td.label { width: 40%; background-color: #BBB; font-weight: bold; font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 80%; text-align: left; } @media (max-width: 840px) { table td.teamspecific{ width: 100%; } } Kansas Jayhawks (1st Half Early) Player Rolls Doubling Rolls Attributes Stars Total Notes PG Daronte Paul 6-3 223 Jr Maize South (Wichita KS) [Aggressive] 4 - - - 2 -2 HCA SG Jawuan Byrd 6-3 211 Fr Pittsburg (Pittsburg KS) [Protection*] 1 5 - 1 6 -1 HCA SF Amral Tanner 6-7 264 (Fr) Maize (Maize KS) [Sharpshooter*] 2 1 * 1 3 -1 HCA PF Tremon Davis 6-8 259 So Piper (Kansas City KS) [Talent*] 1 1 2 1 4 -1 HCA C Dante Rubio 6-9 268 Fr Central (Salina KS) [Rebounder] 1 1 - - 1 -1 HCA, plus any zeroes rolled by OU Total=16 @HAFFnHAFF
  2. Kansas Jayhawks 1st Half Early PG Daronte Paul 6-3 223 Jr Maize South (Wichita KS) [Aggressive] SG Jawuan Byrd 6-3 211 Fr Pittsburg (Pittsburg KS) [Protection*] SF Amral Tanner 6-7 264 (Fr) Maize (Maize KS) [Sharpshooter*] PF Tremon Davis 6-8 259 So Piper (Kansas City KS) [Talent*] C Dante Rubio 6-9 268 Fr Central (Salina KS) [Rebounder]
  3. College Football Playoff Semifinal: #2 LSU (13-1) vs. #3 Oklahoma (13-1) (-1, O/U 48) This is as far as Oklahoma made it last year. Earning the #2 seed as the Big XII champion, the Sooners dueled TCU to a regulation draw and fell 30-27 in overtime to come up short of their second national championship in program history. Now, they're back on the same stage. Instead of Atlanta, they'll head to New Orleans and face a hostile road crowd full of purple and gold. They'll face an opponent studded with stars and future NFL players at virtually every position, an opponent tested through the meat grinder of an SEC schedule and who's come out on top every time but one. On the line is a trip back to Atlanta and a shot at the program's first national championship in eight years with undefeated SMU waiting in the wings. Both teams have at times looked utterly dominant and at times looked utterly shaky. The Tigers lost on the road to national semifinalist Florida and nearly tripped up against an Arkansas team that finished 3-9 the week after. They've also had a stretch where they outscored five opponents by a margin of 196-40 and a second stretch that's seen them outpace an even better set of foes 145-64. That latter stretch, in fact, is active. It includes 20 points allowed to SEC East champion Tennessee in two matchups combined. It includes a doubling-up of Alabama, a road win in College Station, and a rout of an Ole Miss team that beat Mississippi State. Oklahoma's had 6 games decided by one possession, all within an 8-game span. They edged out Texas Tech and TCU, lost at home to Iowa State, then famously benched Nick Brohm for Eric Pope and obliterated Texas--only to beat Kansas State, Baylor, and Oklahoma State by one possession each with only a 31-9 win over West Virginia falling into the mix. But their first four weeks and last two weeks have been examples of the level of play they're capable of. They routed bowl-eligible Tulsa, 9-win Virginia Tech, Kansas, and defending national champion Auburn to start the season. Their Big XII Championship Game was a second rout of West Virginia. Now, they're coming off of a 45-14 blowout of Duke in the quarterfinal. Both teams are playing their best football in a while. Whose hot streak will live on to the very last day of the season? That's not the sort of thing that happens on its own. For Oklahoma to force LSU into an off day, it'll likely be their offense that needs to go nuclear. LSU's offense has had exactly two off games, a 16-13 win over Auburn and the 13-7 win in the SEC Championship Game over Tennessee. They've scored 24 or more points in every other game, and 30 or more in nine of them. You can't credit any one single area of the offense because all of them operate at a high level, but if you had to then the connection between Dontarrious Foster and Jarvis Heard is a great starting place. Foster's completed 68.6% of his passes for 3526 yards, 28 touchdowns, 7 interceptions, and a 160.6 passer rating this season. Heard is by far the team's leading receiver, torching foes to the tune of 1366 yards and 13 touchdowns on 88 catches. There might not be a better receiver in the nation. Fortunately for Oklahoma, there might not be a better cornerback in the nation than Elijah Williams. He's an eraser, and any receiver he lines up across simply does not find himself able to get open. A pass that comes in Williams's direction is more likely to be deflected or intercepted than it is to be caught, and it is more likely to end up a pick-six than a passing touchdown. LSU will do whatever it can to ensure that Heard's matchup isn't Williams. They'll line him up in different spots on the field. They'll motion him. Most importantly, they will try to get him running deep, cycle someone underneath to Williams's side, and force Williams to pass him off to a safety. Oklahoma's safeties are both redshirt freshmen and both struggle in zone coverage, both of which add points of vulnerability if that's the style Oklahoma chooses to play. That's worked so far, for the most part. If Heard were LSU's only weapon, that would be the ballgame. But Foster can rely on Kelvin Faries (55 for 721 yards, 6 TD) or Maurice Redmond (41 for 503 yards, 7 TD) in a pinch. Against Oklahoma State, Williams was able to shut down Samuel Barfield but the surehanded Jeremy Bridges was able to pile up 120 yards on 7 catches on the other side of the field. That's what Jaiden Witherspoon and the rest of this secondary have to prevent. Meanwhile, they can't let Marcus Branch get going. When it comes to usage in the offense, Branch is always going to get the shorter half of the stick--but leaf him alone at your own peril. He's tallied 1469 yards and 12 touchdowns on 288 carries (5.1 YPC) and put up 100 yards or more 10 times. As often as he's topped the century mark, his only games reaching 130 or more came against Michigan State and South Alabama, who rank 114th and 94th in points allowed per game, respectively. He may see a little more action to try and keep Elijah Williams out of the game, but even his usual workload will see him around 20-25 carries. Oklahoma can choose to dare LSU to beat them that way knowing that their front seven can swallow up an opposing run game, considering that they gave up just 74.5 rushing yards over their last six in conference play. They may even have an advantage up front: LSU's interior line is excellent, but Max Abel and Jeremiah Melvin should be able to beat up on the tackles. That's doubly true for Melvin, who's lined up against true freshman Jon Welch. Branch likes to get outside, but that duo should be able to keep him contained. Even so, it's hard not to think of the Iowa State loss, though, and the 138 yards and 2 touchdowns amassed by Kofi McCullough. Given their success against Hayden Dyer, Amral Brown, Mike Freeman, and most recently Christian Collins, perhaps the McCullough game was an outlier. If it wasn't, then LSU's offense is going to be nearly impossible to stop. So to wrap all the way back up, it's Oklahoma's offense that may need to go nuclear. And much like LSU, that starts on the outside. There might not be a better receiver than Heard, but if there is then it's Oklahoma's Lucas Dykes. He has actually outpaced LSU's star and fellow early declaree with 95 catches for 1375 yards and 4 touchdowns. He was most recently seen gliding effortlessly through Duke's secondary to the tune of 185 yards and 2 touchdowns on 10 catches. Like Oklahoma's secondary, LSU's reliant on youth. Safety Golden Burton is a freshman, and Nicolas Colbert is a sophomore. Burton's had two picks, and Colbert's had none. Oklahoma will want to use Pope's big arm and Dykes's sure hands to take advantage. However, LSU's extremely difficult to beat in close. Their corners are big, physical, and intelligent. Clay Vereen has 4 picks and 3 pass breakups. Samir Martin may only be a freshman, but he has a team-high 6 picks. They're even more dangerous in their 3-3-5 look with Kingsley Jackson in the box, as he's intercepted 3 passes himself. Yet none of them are the deadliest, most day-ruiningest players on this Tiger defense. That honor belongs to Leonard England, the latest in a long line of LSU linebackers like Tyrone Jones and Alexander Burton who just shred opposing pockets. England has 67 tackles, 13.5 sacks, 10 tackles for loss, 4 forced fumbles, and an interception. The question isn't whether he'll disrupt Oklahoma's pocket, it's when, how, and how many times. The Sooners will be ready for that challenge. They're stronger on the edge than in the interior. That won't be as helpful knowing that LSU also has several very capable interior rushers including linebacker Kameron McClain and defensive tackle Isaac Escamilla, but one existential threat at a time. Running the ball up the middle against this defense will be an extreme challenge, and whether or not it's a credible challenge will depend on whether Jaiden Douglas (1117 yards and 11 TD on 256 carries) can establish himself early. His ability to do so is the key to opening up everything else. He can wear the defense out so that the explosive Kenyan Chatman can break off a big game. He can draw them in so that Lucas Dykes isn't swarmed in coverage. He can draw the heat so that Eric Pope can keep the ball on some of those read-option plays. Teams that score against LSU typically don't do so by destroying them in one phase of the game or another; they do so with two-pronged success in the run game and efficiency through the air. We know that Pope can be an efficient passer and even an explosive one. In seven games since taking back the starting job, he's completed 68.4% of his passes for 1893 yards, 14 touchdowns, and 3 interceptions. He has a 161.0 passer rating and averages nearly 12.9 yards per completion. We know that Pope can provide one of those prongs in the run game, with his 130 yards and 2 touchdowns on the ground. We know he can get the ball to Lucas Dykes. Everything that has worked against this tough LSU defense is something that Oklahoma's capable of doing. I'm less sure that LSU can hit Oklahoma's weak points like they're used to doing, but it's not that hard to see it happening. These are two nigh-unstoppable offenses and nigh-impenetrable defenses, and yet by the end of the day only one team will be left standing to face the Pony Express. I think Jaiden Douglas grinds out enough yards. I think Eric Pope connects for a few chunk plays. I think Elijah Williams wins the head-to-head battle with Jarvis Heard--or at least draws a stalemate. And I think Oklahoma moves on. #3 Oklahoma 27, #2 LSU 24
  4. Primarily reading Annihilation right now, because the film was one that's going to stick with me forever and I wanted to see how the book is different. Also making some headway into Dune, though keeping names and terminology straight is difficult so far. And I have a few chapters of Randall Munroe from xkcd's How To down, and that's been fun.
  5. Post-2023 update Offense: 14 (-1) Defense: 16 (+1) Special Teams: 10 (+1) Clock Mgmt: 12 Discipline: 14 (+2) Youth Mgmt: 14 (-1) Career: unchanged Achievements: unchanged Feats: unchanged
  6. Seton Hall Pirates at #5 Notre Dame Fighting Irish (55-81)
  7. Notre Dame 2HL should be 18 instead of 19, Jones's Talent is worth +1 instead of +2. Otherwise confirmed @joedchi Seton Hall Pirates at Notre Dame Fighting Irish (55-81)
  8. Tulsa (6-6) vs. Kansas State (6-6) (-8, O/U 52) (Armed Forces Bowl, Fort Worth, TX) The longest bowl drought in Big XII history is over, and for the first time since 2016 the Kansas State Wildcats will play in the postseason. Their Heart of Dallas Bowl matchup against Clemson that year got away from them quickly, with the Tigers scoring the first 17 points in a 24-10 rout. Kansas State remains the only Big XII school that has not had a winning record, but they come in as a favorite against 6-6 Tulsa. The Golden Hurricane make for a particularly intriguing matchup: they began the season losing to Oklahoma and Oklahoma State by a combined score of 90-24, they barely got away with a win against FCS Illinois State, and a blowout loss to SMU dropped them to 2-5. Then their offense caught absolute fire, and they scored 32.2 points per game the rest of the way to win 4 of 5 and earn their bowl bid. Tulsa Golden Hurricanes It's almost as if Tulsa turned on the jets because they knew they had to be here. Now, the only thing standing in the way of Coach Swipet's Wildcats and their first-ever winning season is his old team, the team that gave him his first job, a team that includes players he himself recruited. Tulsa Golden Hurricanes The core of Tulsa's power is their redshirt junior class. Starting quarterback Charles Palmer, runningback Timothy Lima, all three of their top wide receivers, center and top offensive lineman Frederick Smallwood, disruptive nose tackle Kilohana Lealofioa'ana, and second leading tackler and strong safety Robert McQueen all belong to that class. That group isn't all of their impact players, but it represents the single largest bloc of talent on the team and as such their performance will go a long way toward dictating whether or not the Golden Hurricane have a chance. Tulsa Golden Hurricanes Let's start with the backfield. Tulsa's offensive success in the back stretch of their season has largely come as the result of a passing renaissance. Charles Palmer was a 57.7% passer who averaged 257.7 yards, 2.1 touchdowns, and 1.4 interceptions per game over the first seven matchups of the season. In the last five, he averaged 306.4 yards, 2.6 touchdowns, and 0.4 interceptions per game on 65.5% passing. Arona Seau, Dariel Andrade, and tight end Leonard Donahue all became significantly more productive receivers. (Joan Irizzary was the exception.) They ran the ball more often and more effectively: the run went from non-threatening at 35.3 yards per game to slightly threatening at 79.4 yards per game. The schematic changes implemented over the week 10 bye worked, and they make the Golden Hurricane offense truly dangerous. Tulsa Golden Hurricanes For Kansas State, priority number one has to be taking tight end Leonard Donahue out of the game. His 67 catches, 986 yards, 10 touchdowns, and 14.7 yards per catch are all team-highs. Expect tight end duty to fall to linebackers Tim Workman and Mario Hamilton, each of whom have been excellent in pass coverage this season. They have 8 of the team's 9 interceptions, with Sammy Schuler as the only defensive back on the team with a pick. Hamilton is also the team's leading tackler (57), he's dragged down 9 tackles behind the line of scrimmage, and he has 2.0 sacks and a forced fumble, and he earned All-Big XII honors at outside linebacker. This is a defense that absolutely has to win at the line of scrimmage, which should be doable against an unimpressive Tulsa line that's given up a pair of sacks per game. Arona Seau's got enough speed to burn to threaten the Wildcats' secondary if they give Charles Palmer enough time to throw, but Palmer tends to look for Donahue first before progressing to Seau--so again, taking Donahue out comes first. Tulsa Golden Hurricanes Tulsa's defense is set up similar to Kansas State's. They have to win up front, or they don't win at all. They like to bring pressure, and they can bring it from anywhere. That starts with sophomore Lardarius "Wagon Wheel" Rucker, who has a team-high 6.0 sacks and 4 tackles for loss. True senior Ricky Moran has another 4.0 sacks from the other defensive end spot, true senior Kamar Jackson has 3.0 as an outside linebacker, and seven different Golden Hurricane have at least one sack. One of them is safety Brandon Robertson--when I say they can bring pressure from anywhere, I mean everywhere. In their five-game hot streak they've sacked the quarterback 2.6 times per game compared to a mere 1.0 sack per game in their 2-5 start. When they don't get home, bad things happen. They only have 6 interceptions all season, and Zachary Wendt is the only player they have with as many as 2 picks. Nobody even has more than 2 pass breakups. With corners who grade out highest in zone coverage and safeties who grade out highest in man, it's a struggle to mesh the whole unit together. Tulsa Golden Hurricanes All of that is great news for a pass-happy Kansas State offense. Shane Kruse is the first Kansas State passer to throw for 3000 yards in a season, tallying up 3331 yards, 21 touchdowns, and 9 interceptions on 59.9% passing while adding 4 touchdowns on the ground. He has an All-Big XII receiver in Jermaine Jordan (68 for 974 yards, 6 TD, 14.3 yards/reception) to throw to, but that's not to overshadow Joel De La Cruz-Venegas (65 for 801 yards, 6 TD, 12.3 yards/reception) or senior Jhonny Palacios (57 for 749 yards, 7 TD, 13.1 yards/reception), who is the school's all-time leader in receptions, receiving yards, and receiving touchdowns. Tulsa has a very young secondary. It's talented, but the lack of experience has been costly as assignments get missed and the safeties have to clean things up. Brandon Robertson and Robert McQueen are good at that, but they can't be everywhere if Kansas State spreads the field and Kruse attacks the right matchup. Tulsa Golden Hurricanes I worry that Kansas State's offensive line might not be up to the challenge of an aggressive Tulsa front, but Kruse is quick on his feet and able to move about the pocket. His arm is a difference-maker. The receivers are a matchup problem for Tulsa, and Kansas State's aptitude at linebacker (plus Sammy Schuler) should be able to limit Tulsa's primary offensive threats. This is a dangerous, red-hot Tulsa team that's capable of winning this game. But this is a determined, fearless, and talented Kansas State team that has already racked up a more impressive body count than any Kansas State team to come before them. I'll take the Wildcats to win and cover. Tulsa Golden Hurricanes Kansas State 35, Tulsa 21 Tulsa Golden Hurricanes
  9. Texas (6-6) vs. Fresno State (9-3) (+6.5, O/U 48) (Cactus Bowl, Phoenix, AZ) This isn't Ryan Harris's Fresno State lining up on the other side of the ball from Texas's eleventh consecutive bowl-eligible team. Nor is this Sam Hiller-Weeden's Fresno State lining up against a Texas team looking to finish over .500 for the first time since 2020. No, this is a Fresno State team that thrives on old-school, run-first, defense-first football lining up against a Texas that's looking to break a two-game bowl losing streak and end a topsy-turvy season on a high note. The Bulldogs have a lot of young talent in the passing game. Wide receiver Blake Coates and tight end Ian Wright were among the top prospects at their positions in their class. Between Coates's 667 yards and 9 touchdowns and Wright's 854 yards and 4 touchdowns, the duo is accounting for the vast majority of the team's passing production. There's a steep drop-off after them to veterans Tywin Helm and Ajani Walker, to the point where Texas is in a good position as long as they can force redshirt sophomore quarterback Teddy Cagle (2327 yards, 16 TD, 7 INT on 58.6% passing) to go through some progressions. The defensive line, led by NFL Draft early declaree Zion Gaines, can shorten that clock. He, Jamal Robinson, and Thomas Sanders have combined for 17 sacks this season. As long as a relatively quiet secondary can stay together long enough, that'll keep the defense from getting the top taken off. But the bigger question on defense will be whether they can stop Shaq Wyatt, who finished the regular season tops among all freshmen and tied for second in the nation with 21 rushing touchdowns to go with 1455 yards. He and California's Zachary McFadden were the only FBS runningbacks to rush for at least 5.7 yards per carry and 120.0 yards per game while coughing up the football no more than once through the entire regular season. If this freshman season is any indication at all, Wyatt's in for a very long and very special career. Rushing up the middle with Gaines waiting for him will be a test for both the freshman and the junior, particularly because Gaines is the only member of the Texas defense with more than 2 rushing tackles for loss on the season (he has 6 to go with 6.5 sacks). The interior of Fresno State's line is star-studded, and in particular the combination of John Watson at guard and Cooper Jones at center is almost impenetrable. Their offensive line rated top-30 in the FCS and top-5 among all G5 lines. If Gaines can't control the point of attack--practically by himself--this will be trouble. For comparison: Kofi McCullough torched Texas's defense. Hayden Dyer got bottled up. Amral Brown fell somewhere in the middle. It's hard to tell how Texas will respond to a given challenge in a given week. The Longhorns' defense was the unit that came into the season with many question marks. The offense only had one: how good would Sam Milner be? He answered that question by winning Big XII Offensive Player of the Year, leading the conference in passer rating by the narrowest of margins, throwing for 3322 yards, 25 touchdowns, and 8 interceptions on 62.7% passing, and rushing for 274 yards and 4 touchdowns (but fumbling 3 times, losing two). He showed immediate chemistry with slot receiver Shaq Dixon, who had one of the most explosive seasons in the country. Dixon is one of seven receivers nationwide to average at least 16 yards per catch on 50 catches or more, and he finished with a team-high 868 yards and 7 touchdowns without a drop out of the slot to spark life into a beleaguered Texas receiver corps. Shaun Lyles and Elias Person developed into useful targets, with 725 yards and 8 scores for the senior Lyles along with 711 yards and 5 scores for the junior Person. True freshman Natrone Benjamin adds a fourth target as well. This depth's going to be important against a Fresno State secondary that drops off quick after A.J. Gilchrist. His 3 interceptions don't jump off the page at you, but he's shown a versatility to play both zone and man at a high level. He's likely to see a lot of Lyles, which leaves Dixon free to run with Nat Bland. Bland's picked off two passes, so that's not a gimme--but he's no Gilchrist. Safety Carter Vereen's also capable of providing help, and he's had a couple of interceptions. Strong safety Ashton Richmond may be a weak point: he has 30 tackles, but he has yet to arrive in time to make a play on the ball in coverage. But mostly, Texas is going to be more concerned about the front seven. The linebackers are active in coverage. Garrett Schulz and Zontavius Bethea have 2 picks each and have combined for 6 pass breakups. Schulz also has a team-high 39 tackles (3 for loss) and a forced fumble. They have five different defensive linemen who'll play, though only four have really made an impact. Chief among them is Vince Walls, with 9.5 sacks and 5 tackles for loss from right end. Alshon Wooten has 4.0 sacks at left end, defensive tackle Etena Leiataua is havoc-causer-in-chief with 2 forced fumbles and 1 recovery to go with 3.0 sacks and 2 tackles for loss, and nose tackle Mateo Evans is the primary run stopper with 4.5 sacks and 7 tackles for loss. The Bulldogs won't have to worry much about stopping the run because Texas has struggled in that department--starting tailback Dontae Alford finished with 595 yards, 6 touchdowns, and 3 fumbles (2 lost) on 3.8 yards per carry. The Bulldogs' primary objective will be to get to Milner before Dixon can bust off a big play. That's the whole ballgame. The Longhorns have been above-average but not elite at keeping Milner upright. Bobby Drake's a likely early-round pick at left tackle, Tony Keating and Tyus Fair are high-level prospects at guard, and they'll still have their hands full. I think this is just a bad matchup for Texas. Fresno State's offensive line is probably too much for the Longhorns' defense to handle, and that's going to open things up for the whole offense. Texas's own offense hasn't looked like itself in weeks, so they can't afford for the defense to lose that battle. This is a Fresno team that's won 9 games, and their three losses came by a single possession each against much of the MWC's finest. They went on the road and beat Nevada, though they also didn't play any P5 teams in the regular season. Still, there are a lot of P5 teams that wish they had the talent Fresno State does. When it comes to their defense, even Texas is one of those teams. I'm picking the Bulldogs to pull the upset in Phoenix. Fresno State 29, Texas 26
  10. Eric Pope's 385 yards and 216.9 passer rating are a school record for a bowl game. The passing yards are also a school record for a postseason game of any kind, and the passer rating was less than half a point from Graham Burnett's record of 217.38 set in the 2019 Big XII Championship Game against Baylor.
  11. Re-roll for Washington table { width: 70%; border-spacing: 0; } table td { padding: 3px; } tr { background-color: #FFF; } tr:nth-child(even){ background-color: #EAEAEA; } table.boxscore tr { background-color: #fff; } table.boxscore td { font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 90%; text-align: center; border: 1px solid #D3D3D3; border-right: 0px; border-top: 0px; } table.boxscore td:first-of-type { border-left: 0px; } table.boxscore tr:first-of-type td, table.boxscore tr:last-of-type td { border-bottom: 0px; } table.compare td { font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 80%; text-align: center; } table td.block { height: 35px; text-align: center; font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 100%; background-color: #00004c; color: #fff; font-weight: bold; } table td.teamspecific { width: 49%; min-width: 400px; display:inline-block; } table td.teamspecific td.stat{ text-align: left; } table td.teamspecific td.name{ text-align: left; } table td.teamspecific td.stat.name{ width: 12%; background-color: #BBB; font-weight:bold; font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 80%; } table td.teamspecific td.label { width: 40%; background-color: #BBB; font-weight: bold; font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 80%; text-align: left; } @media (max-width: 840px) { table td.teamspecific{ width: 100%; } } Kansas Jayhawks 2nd Half Late Player Rolls Doubling Rolls Attributes Stars Total Notes PG Trevor Bradley 6-3 214 (Jr) Maize (Maize KS) [Motivation*] 4 - - 1 5 - SG Clevon McGee 6-4 218 So Piper (Kansas City KS) [6th Man] 0 - 3 - 3 - SF Keon Simms 6-6 241 Sr Hanover (Hanover KS) [Fatigued**] 0 - - 0 0 - PF Dashaud Washington 6-8 261 (Jr) St. John (St. John KS) [Talent**] 1 4 2 2 9 - C Dante Rubio 6-9 268 Fr Central (Salina KS) [Rebounder] 0 - 1 - 1 +1 for Rebounder Total=18
  12. Kansas Jayhawks 2nd Half Late PG Trevor Bradley 6-3 214 (Jr) Maize (Maize KS) [Motivation*] SG Clevon McGee 6-4 218 So Piper (Kansas City KS) [6th Man] SF Keon Simms 6-6 241 Sr Hanover (Hanover KS) [Fatigued**] PF Dashaud Washington 6-8 261 (Jr) St. John (St. John KS) [Talent**] C Dante Rubio 6-9 268 Fr Central (Salina KS) [Rebounder]
  13. Re-roll for Tanner table { width: 70%; border-spacing: 0; } table td { padding: 3px; } tr { background-color: #FFF; } tr:nth-child(even){ background-color: #EAEAEA; } table.boxscore tr { background-color: #fff; } table.boxscore td { font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 90%; text-align: center; border: 1px solid #D3D3D3; border-right: 0px; border-top: 0px; } table.boxscore td:first-of-type { border-left: 0px; } table.boxscore tr:first-of-type td, table.boxscore tr:last-of-type td { border-bottom: 0px; } table.compare td { font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 80%; text-align: center; } table td.block { height: 35px; text-align: center; font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 100%; background-color: #00004c; color: #fff; font-weight: bold; } table td.teamspecific { width: 49%; min-width: 400px; display:inline-block; } table td.teamspecific td.stat{ text-align: left; } table td.teamspecific td.name{ text-align: left; } table td.teamspecific td.stat.name{ width: 12%; background-color: #BBB; font-weight:bold; font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 80%; } table td.teamspecific td.label { width: 40%; background-color: #BBB; font-weight: bold; font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 80%; text-align: left; } @media (max-width: 840px) { table td.teamspecific{ width: 100%; } } Kansas Jayhawks (2nd Half Early) Player Rolls Doubling Rolls Attributes Stars Total Notes PG Trevor Bradley 6-3 214 (Jr) Maize (Maize KS) [Motivation*] 4 - - 1 4 -1 for Protection SG Jawuan Byrd 6-3 211 Fr Pittsburg (Pittsburg KS) [Protection*] 5 - - 1 5 -1 for Protection SF Amral Tanner 6-7 264 (Fr) Maize (Maize KS) [Sharpshooter*] 1 3 - 1 5 - PF Dashaud Washington 6-8 261 (Jr) St. John (St. John KS) [Talent**] 4 - 2 2 8 - C Dante Rubio 6-9 268 Fr Central (Salina KS) [Rebounder] 2 - 1 - 3 +1 for Rebounder Total=25 @acewulf
  14. Kansas Jayhawks 2nd Half Early PG Trevor Bradley 6-3 214 (Jr) Maize (Maize KS) [Motivation*] SG Jawuan Byrd 6-3 211 Fr Pittsburg (Pittsburg KS) [Protection*] SF Amral Tanner 6-7 264 (Fr) Maize (Maize KS) [Sharpshooter*] PF Dashaud Washington 6-8 261 (Jr) St. John (St. John KS) [Talent**] C Dante Rubio 6-9 268 Fr Central (Salina KS) [Rebounder]
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