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stormstopper

Conference Commissioner
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  1. stormstopper

    [2022] Week #12 - Saturday Afternoon

    Thank goodness for that, too.
  2. stormstopper

    [2022] Week #12 - Saturday Afternoon

    Sometimes I hate being right. Couldn't get enough pressure, couldn't stop the run at all. Really gonna need to tighten that up in the last three games. GG Zack!
  3. stormstopper

    [2022] Week #12 - Saturday Morning

    Plays where West Virginia started with the ball accounted for 2 West Virginia touchdowns and 2 TCU touchdowns. Dominant performance on the road.
  4. Maybe there won't be any upsets this week. Maybe there will. But after Kansas State's bid against Texas fell heartbreakingly short in Austin on Friday night, it's clear that there's a viable path in both other conference matchups this week. West Virginia's defense gives it a chance against TCU. Kansas has matched up well against Oklahoma State several years running. Even Iowa State has a chance if they can impose their will on the ground against Virginia Tech's stout defense. The favorites this week are sailing into treacherous waters in the nation's most exciting conference, and whoever survives will be made stronger for it. Let's talk about the games. Saturday Morning #4 TCU (7-1) at West Virginia (4-4) (+5.5) We open up Saturday with a battle between arguably the two best defenses in the nation's most exciting conference. That's an honor TCU came into the season expecting to be bestowed with, and at fewer than 18.3 points allowed per game they've certainly lived up to it. They've shut down even some of the best offenses in the country--they held Oklahoma State to 17 points and Oklahoma to 16 in games that sealed their status as Big XII frontrunners. Their calling card for years has been on the defensive side of the ball, and this year they've been particularly tough because there just isn't anywhere to attach or anyone to exploit. Five different Horned Frogs have recorded a rushing tackle for loss, six have recorded a sack, four have snagged an interception (three have taken at least two), and four have batted down a pass. Trying to run on their defense is a question of whether Kwon Shaw will eat you up at the line before Elliot McElmore gets there; trying to throw on them is a question of whether Chance Herring sacks you before you have a chance to get picked off by Patrick Ross or Roman Blackmon. That's the dilemma for West Virginia, whose offense has sputtered as of late with 27 combined points in losses to Baylor and Texas Tech. Martin Lake's completing about 60% of his passes for 221.6 yards per game, 13 touchdowns, and 6 interceptions. Much of that goes to Corey Easley (50 for 738 yards, 6 TD), and with Bryce Madison struggling to shorten distance-to-go on the ground it's tough for the offense to be sustained only on those numbers through the air. Finding some way to get things moving would at least keep TCU's defense off-balance some of the time, which will be necessary of the Mountaineers want to find any purchase. But on the other hand, TCU's going to have to find a way to score on a West Virginia defense that ranks 5th in the nation in points allowed per game. Just like Frogs, the Mountaineers have not allowed an opponent to score 21 points or more since their opening game of the season. It's a defense that loves to be aggressive up front and make plays behind the line of scrimmage. Aaron Pagan has 6.0 sacks and 6 tackles for loss, joined by 3.5 sacks and 4 tackles for loss by Elvis Cornejo, joined in turn by one sack and 5 tackles for loss by defensive tackle Riley Reardon and 3 more tackles for loss by Nathan Wilks. But what's evolved about this defense is that the secondary's starting to go deeper than Lamont Carson. Safety Preston Evans now has 3 interceptions, a pass breakup, and a fumble recovery. The safeties have always looked like the weakest part of West Virginia's defense, but that ought to give Felix Luck and company a bit of pause. Griffin McHanna hasn't made his presence well enough known this season to be a threat to take the top off of the defense, but Finn Nielsen and tight end Miguel Aguilera will look to pick at it and find a way to get open against man coverage. Perhaps the film TCU's paid the most attention to, though, was the film of Solomon McLaughlin rushing for 155 yards against the Mountaineers their last time out. West Virginia's been good against tailbacks not named McLaughlin, but TCU can at least try to open up the same types of holes for Martin Gifford given that they have the only offensive line in the conference that's on Texas Tech's level. Gifford's been a difference-maker, averaging 104.6 yards per game and scoring 10 touchdowns on the ground. If he gets going, TCU's offense is hard to stop. West Virginia's one of the few defenses that can slow down Gifford and slow down the passing attack at the same time. Their defense gives them a legitimate chance to pull off this upset at home. But I don't think their offense will be able to muster enough against a defense like TCU's to get the job done. #4 TCU 17, West Virginia 13 Saturday Afternoon Virginia Tech (6-2) at Iowa State (1-7) (+23.5) As we roll into the afternoon slate, Iowa State takes a break from what's been a tough season of conference play to take on its second ACC foe of the season with Virginia Tech coming into town. The Hokies are looking to bounce back from a 21-point home loss to Duke, while Iowa State is hoping to snap a 6-game losing streak and just get back on the board any way they can. To do so, though, they'll need to figure out how to run the ball against a Virginia Tech defense that simply hasn't made a habit of letting opponents do so. The Hokies allow just 61.5 rushing yards per game, and fewer than 3.4 yards per carry. That's despite playing a rather productive set of rush offenses; things just stop working on the ground when it's the Hokies on the other side of the ball. Their effort starts with Jabari Jean, a small but quick defensive end who has 6.5 sacks and 4 tackles for loss this year. Janoris Booker and Mahamadou Chavis each have another 3.0 sacks, and the Hokies have five different players with at least two tackles for loss this season. That poses a challenge for an Iowa State offensive line that's struggled all year, and it means Kofi McCullough will have to get extra creative if he wants to hit or exceed his 110.5 yards per game on 5.1 yards per carry that underpin the Iowa State offense. The difficulty they might experience running the ball is compounded by the fact that throwing against this defense is just as difficult: they hold opponents 30.8 points below their typical passer rating, and Vaughn Sheppard's rating already isn't very high. Their defense is a don't-bend-do-break defense: their safeties are a weakness, but everything in front of them makes it difficult to actually attack them. Their pass rush gets home. Their corners are excellent: Trevor McKinney has 5 interceptions and 7 pass breakups. This is just one of the best defenses in the country. Virginia Tech's offense isn't playing at the same elite level as the defense, but it's been playing at a top-40 or top-50 level. They average 27.4 points per game. Beckett Morrison completes 60.2% of his passes, averaging 243.4 yards per game with 17 touchdowns, 6 interceptions, and a 144.6 passer rating. He's also added a couple of touchdowns on the ground. He's the primary focus of the offense; runningback Julius Whitaker's 81.9 yards per game and 4.2 yards per carry make him more of a complementary piece. Iowa State needs to be able to contain Morrison's arm first and legs second. But they haven't really been able to do so against previous opponents. They have 4 sacks all season, three of which came in their first two games. They also have 4 interceptions all season, three of which also came in their first two games. Maybe stepping out of conference play will be the breath of fresh air they need to get back on track. But while Virginia Tech's strength of schedule has been suspect, that same suspectness gives them a lot of experience playing opponents like Iowa State and running up the margin on them. I think the Hokies get through with little trouble. Virginia Tech 31, Iowa State 14 #16 Oklahoma State (6-2) at Kansas (4-4) (+17.5) Last season, this matchup produced one of the more surprising results in the Big XII when a 3-3 Kansas walked into Stillwater and came away with a 31-10 win behind an explosive game from Christian Graham and two interceptions from Ian Baldwin. The year before, this matchup produced one of the more unusual box scores we've ever seen as 16 defensive points from Kansas helped them overcome a poor game from Christian Graham to win 47-41 to end Oklahoma State's undefeated start. Once again, Oklahoma State comes into this matchup with a much better record and is heavily favored to win. Once again, Kansas will try to make some magic happen. By that, I mean that they're going to try to get to the quarterback and force him into bad throws like they have each of the last three meetings: they've sacked Chester Brenner and Ian Baldwin 9 times in the last three meetings and intercepted 6 of their passes. The defensive line has combined for 8.0 sacks and 17 rushing tackles for loss this season, though they've only had 5 interceptions. It's not quite the same pressure front that they've had lately. Furthermore, Oklahoma State doesn't need to be as reliant on the pass as they once were. Runningback Amral Brown is a bruiser, averaging a 135.8 rushing yards per game and a Big XII-best 6.5 yards per carry. He's scored 15 rushing touchdowns, the most of any Big XII player not named Solomon McLaughlin. And he's going up against a Kansas run defense that has been giving up a lot against the run--137.1 yards per game, to be precise. Even in the win against Texas Tech, Kansas gave up 175 on the ground. Oklahoma State can establish the run and use it to open up the passing game, taking shots downfield to Samuel Barfield (700 yards, 7 TD) and Jeremy Bridges (602 yards, 6 TD). Oklahoma State should be able to score, and the rest will be about whether they can keep Christian Graham contained. The redshirt junior has been hot during this three-game winning streak, averaging 305.3 yards on 68.8% passing over that stretch with 7 touchdowns and no interceptions. Sebastian Thorpe has emerged as an actual option for him (220 yards and 2 TD in those three games), while Jaime Bautista has continued to be as productive as any tight end in the country. Kansas hasn't been as awful on the ground as they were at the start of the year, but Andre Black still hasn't been good enough to be a real factor. Oklahoma State's been tough against the pass, however. They give up just 160.8 yards per game through the air, holding opponents 51.6 yards per game below their averages. It's hard to target any one area of the defense, because six different players have intercepted a pass--and Brian Suarez has batted down three without an interception, so he's due. The bottom line is that Kansas doesn't need the defensive pressure or an explosive game from Graham--they need both. On the other hand, Oklahoma State just needs to take what the defense gives them on the ground and use that to press their advantage through the air, or they can just play the pass defense they're accustomed to. Kansas will give them a challenge, but I expect Oklahoma State to break their four-game skid against the Jayhawks. #16 Oklahoma State 34, Kansas 24 Byes: #5 Oklahoma (8-1), Baylor (4-5), #18 Texas Tech (7-2)
  5. stormstopper

    [2022] Week #12 - FNF

    They didn't go for 2, they missed the extra point
  6. stormstopper

    [2022] Week #12 - FNF

    Julius Minnow's 150.7 passer rating is the second-highest of his career against Big XII opponents, trailing only his effort against TCU in week 13 of the 2018 season. It is the ninth time a Kansas State passer has had a rating of 150 or better in a conference game; the Wildcats are 4-5 when that happens (and 3-5 setting a minimum of 10 passes attempted). Including non-conference games, it's the fourth-highest rating of Minnow's career. It's the fifth-highest passing yardage total by a Kansas State quarterback ever, and the second time a Kansas State player has thrown for 290+ yards and 3+ TD without an interception (the other being Minnow against Liberty this year). Simeon Wells's 192 rushing yards are the second-most in a single game by a Big XII player this year, trailing Solomon McLaughlin's 300 against South Alabama. It's the highest total by a Texas runningback not named Sterling Brown; the two-time Doak Walker award winner hit 192 or better on 7 occasions, the last of which was week 13 of the 2015 season. He's the first Big XII runningback with at least 192 yards on fewer than 25 carries since Maurice White against Texas Tech in 2019. Kyler Tackett maintained a 166.8 passer rating, snapping a streak of five straight games under 116. It's the first time he's attempted at least 25 passes without an interception since week 7 of the 2021 season, with 14 games in the interim (not counting the two Beckwith games). In the six games Texas and Kansas State have played, two have been shutout wins for Texas. Every time Kansas State has scored a point, they've been within one score entering the fourth quarter, but in every case Texas pulled out the win.
  7. Friday Night Kansas State (2-6) at Texas (4-4) (-11) One way or another, a losing streak is going to end in Austin on Friday night. Whose losing streak it will be? That's anybody's guess. The fact that this is not an open-and-shut case is a bit surprising: not only is Texas 5-0 all-time against Kansas State (albeit with two or three close calls), but they started this season 4-0 and were ranked in the coaches' poll. They slid from the ranks of the undefeated with a respectable loss to TCU, then followed it up with a loss to Florida--but their last two losses have been blowouts to the Oklahoma schools in which the Longhorns did not reach the endzone. Playing against a Kansas State defense that gives up more points than any Big XII team other than Iowa State might be the antidote for their offensive woes. On the other hand, maybe playing a Texas offense that scores fewer points than any Big XII team not name Iowa State will be just what Kansas State needs to snap their 5-game losing streak that has overlapped with all of conference play. Both coaches have promised major adjustments, recognizing the significance of this game: Kansas State would miss a bowl game for the sixth straight year with a loss, and Texas would be on the brink of their first bowl miss. So what do we expect to see? For one thing, we expect to see the teams' respective passing games change focus. Kansas State really wants to get redshirt freshman Jermaine Jordan involved. Seeing that he has 549 yards and 2 touchdowns primarily out of the slot, it's not hard to see why. Look to see him take snaps at split end, where he'll have to contend with star cornerback Devon Braxton. Braxton may have the size advantage, but Jordan is quick and elusive. If he can find his way into open space before Tristan Priest, Zion Gaines, and Thomas Sanders collapse the backfield then there are yards available. But putting Jordan into matchups with Braxton does pose a risk: Braxton has 5 interceptions and 4 passes defended this season, and he's the only defensive back with one of either. (Linebacker Samir Sneed has 1 interception and 2 passes defended, and that's it for the whole team.) Will Jhonny Palacios have a better shot at a big game with Braxton more likely to be on Jordan's side of the field? We'll see. Texas is also doing a wide receiver shuffle-up, but a more exotic one: tight end Francesco Sewell is moving to flanker. He has a 6-4, 198-pound frame and ranks third on the team in receiving yards with 282 (and 1 touchdown). The Longhorns are going to leave Shaun Lyles (team-high 29 catches for 338 yards, 2 TD) at split end, and Da'Quan Crockett will man the slot. Crockett will need to overcome a sophomore's case of freshman-hands to succeed there: he has three drops and a retained fumble in addition to his 308 yards and 1 touchdown. A receiver reset might reboot Kyler Tackett, who is in the midst of a career-worst year with a 62.0% completion percentage, 6 touchdowns, and 5 interceptions after being benched the first two games. I would argue that they need Simeon Wells to be back online and that Kansas State has had a habit of rehabilitating struggling opposing runningbacks--except that Wells has been over 100 yards on at least 5.1 yards per carry each of the last two games in which Texas did not score a touchdown. Wells needs to have better ball security, but he's been fine. It really, truly is up to Kyler Tackett to show some improvement if Texas's offense is to get back into form over the final four games. Over the course of this game, though, he just has to be good enough to let Braxton and the defense carry him. I don't expect this to be a fireworks show; both teams are going to have to work for their yards and their points. But I expect things to come just a little bit easier for Texas, and I expect the Longhorns to survive. Texas 24, Kansas State 19
  8. Just because Drake never put out a diss track to respond to Pusha T's "The Story of Adidon" doesn't mean we can't take a page from his Meek Mill playbook and go Back to Back. Our issue from earlier this evening covered total quarterback yardage; this one is going to deal with quarterback efficiency. We're going to look at opponent-adjusted passer rating this time, using the same process with passer ratings that we did for total quarterback yards. All stats are through week 11. Opponent-Adjusted Passer Rating 1. Stanford - Troy McMurray (+68.92 adjusted passer rating) 2. Duke - Bryce Thompson (+50.29 adjusted passer rating) 3. Mississippi State - Storm Whittaker (+49.73 adjusted passer rating) 4. Rice - Eric McLean (+44.47 adjusted passer rating) 5. San Diego State - David Edmondson (+40.03 adjusted passer rating) 6. Clemson - Akiem Williams III (+39.59 adjusted passer rating) 7. Auburn - Marcus Black (+38.45 adjusted passer rating) 8. Oklahoma State - Ian Baldwin (+37.62 adjusted passer rating) 9. Oklahoma - Eric Pope (+36.37 adjusted passer rating) 10. Hawaii - J.T. Youngblood (+35.57 adjusted passer rating) 11. Washington - Jake Davis (+34.46 adjusted passer rating) 12. Navy - Zach Lombardi (+34.06 adjusted passer rating) 13. BYU - Jabari Sneed (+32.94 adjusted passer rating) 14. Michigan State - Isaac Tyson (+31.99 adjusted passer rating) 15. SMU - Marcus Burden (+30.85 adjusted passer rating) 16. Virginia - Mike Lucas (+30.65 adjusted passer rating) 17. UAB - Elijah Currie-Madison (+28.6 adjusted passer rating) 18. James Madison - Multiple Passers (+25.9 adjusted passer rating) 19. North Dakota State - Zack McAllister (+25.61 adjusted passer rating) 20. Tennessee - Adrian Goldson (+25.05 adjusted passer rating) 21. Michigan - Evan Perkins (+24.46 adjusted passer rating) 22. USC - Marc Lockwood (+23.78 adjusted passer rating) 23. Minnesota - Robert Lynch (+22.02 adjusted passer rating) 24. TCU - Felix Luck (+21.59 adjusted passer rating) 25. Georgia - Zeke Burkett (+20.83 adjusted passer rating) 26. Western Michigan - Chase Sims (+20.3 adjusted passer rating) 27. Purdue - Kyle Jefferson (+20.27 adjusted passer rating) 28. Kentucky - Elijah McManus (+19.98 adjusted passer rating) 29. Alabama - Linus Petty (+19.48 adjusted passer rating) 30. Washington State - Bradley Hassan (+19.42 adjusted passer rating) 31. Virginia Tech - Beckett Morrison (+18.26 adjusted passer rating) 32. Ohio State - Matt Ballard (+17.94 adjusted passer rating) 33. Nevada - Jordan Godwin (+17.76 adjusted passer rating) 34. UTSA - Justin Radford (+17.66 adjusted passer rating) 35. Texas A&M - Nathan Singletary (+17.55 adjusted passer rating) 36. Nebraska - Sean Connell (+16.26 adjusted passer rating) 37. Pittsburgh - Messiah Winston (+15.58 adjusted passer rating) 38. Tulsa - Charles Palmer (+15.41 adjusted passer rating) 39. Central Michigan - Byron Suggs (+12.98 adjusted passer rating) 40. Ohio - Austin Lowe (+12.88 adjusted passer rating) 41. Memphis - Cooper Spillman (+12.49 adjusted passer rating) 42. Louisville - Nick Carr (+12.41 adjusted passer rating) 43. Syracuse - Connor McLean (+12.32 adjusted passer rating) 44. Eastern Washington - Samuel Connor (+11.59 adjusted passer rating) 45. Northwestern - E.J. McGuire (+10.72 adjusted passer rating) 46. Penn State - Dillon Sneed (+10.38 adjusted passer rating) 47. UCLA - Aaron Harden (+10.04 adjusted passer rating) 48. Missouri - Travis Ricketts (+9.93 adjusted passer rating) 49. Colorado - Mike Naylor (+9.64 adjusted passer rating) 50. Florida - Darion Harrison (+9.57 adjusted passer rating) 51. Notre Dame - Brendan Lange (+8.7 adjusted passer rating) 52. Eastern Michigan - Giovanni Shaw (+7.79 adjusted passer rating) 53. Bowling Green - A.J. Coyne (+7.64 adjusted passer rating) 54. Florida International - Gavin Copeland (+6.21 adjusted passer rating) 55. UTEP - Darnell Prince (+5.91 adjusted passer rating) 56. Temple - Eli Siegel (+5.35 adjusted passer rating) 57. North Carolina - Mitchell Denton (+5.34 adjusted passer rating) 58. Kansas - Christian Graham (+4.97 adjusted passer rating) 59. Illinois - Jordan Harrison (+4.28 adjusted passer rating) 60. Florida State - Brett England (+4.28 adjusted passer rating) 61. South Alabama - Rafael Higgins (+3.99 adjusted passer rating) 62. East Carolina - Kyler Wilson (+3.8 adjusted passer rating) 63. Old Dominion - Dylan Hamlin (+3.71 adjusted passer rating) 64. Illinois State - Phillip Stephenson (+3.12 adjusted passer rating) 65. USF - Savion Ross (+3.07 adjusted passer rating) 66. Georgia Tech - Josh Beckett (+2.82 adjusted passer rating) 67. LSU - Jamel Woodson (+2.78 adjusted passer rating) 68. West Virginia - Martin Lake (+1.44 adjusted passer rating) 69. Northern Iowa - Jameson Beckwith (+1.01 adjusted passer rating) 70. North Dakota - Robbie Koehler (+0.5 adjusted passer rating) 71. Maryland - Brian Andersen (+0.47 adjusted passer rating) 72. Arkansas State - Eugene Salas (+0.46 adjusted passer rating) 73. North Texas - Elias Noble (-0.15 adjusted passer rating) 74. Texas - Multiple Passers (-0.48 adjusted passer rating) 75. UCF - Dwayne Bennett (-1.21 adjusted passer rating) 76. Vanderbilt - Tyler Mackey (-1.89 adjusted passer rating) 77. Southern Miss - Alexander Cassidy (-2.02 adjusted passer rating) 78. Air Force - Multiple Passers (-2.52 adjusted passer rating) 79. Miami (OH) - Zack Cera (-2.6 adjusted passer rating) 80. Northern Illinois - Charlie Sanford (-3.35 adjusted passer rating) 81. Connecticut - Rob Andersen (-3.79 adjusted passer rating) 82. South Carolina - Aidan Peters (-3.94 adjusted passer rating) 83. Charlotte - Chris Billings (-4.82 adjusted passer rating) 84. Texas Tech - Donald Garrett (-4.96 adjusted passer rating) 85. Baylor - Caleb Olmsted (-5.2 adjusted passer rating) 86. Akron - Griffin Donahue (-5.33 adjusted passer rating) 87. NC State - Jacob Eubanks (-6.23 adjusted passer rating) 88. Boise State - Ian Cannon (-6.64 adjusted passer rating) 89. Miami (FL) - Jason Ledford (-6.97 adjusted passer rating) 90. Cincinnati - Dillon Schaeffer (-7.24 adjusted passer rating) 91. Arkansas - Multiple Passers (-7.34 adjusted passer rating) 92. Arizona State - Multiple Passers (-7.47 adjusted passer rating) 93. Kansas State - Julius Minnow (-7.59 adjusted passer rating) 94. Middle Tennessee - Tim Pritchard (-7.59 adjusted passer rating) 95. Oregon - Jason Baum (-7.64 adjusted passer rating) 96. Oregon State - Eli Sherrill (-9.34 adjusted passer rating) 97. Houston - Rickie Shaffer (-9.47 adjusted passer rating) 98. Indiana - Rangi Grey (-10.74 adjusted passer rating) 99. Army - Vince Larue (-11.09 adjusted passer rating) 100. Rutgers - Blair Sullivan (-11.4 adjusted passer rating) 101. Wake Forest - James Betts (-11.85 adjusted passer rating) 102. California - Nick Ellison (-12.43 adjusted passer rating) 103. San Jose State - Travis Clinton (-12.57 adjusted passer rating) 104. Fresno State - Teddy Cagle (-12.91 adjusted passer rating) 105. Toledo - Multiple Passers (-13.17 adjusted passer rating) 106. New Mexico - Riley Head (-14.14 adjusted passer rating) 107. Western Kentucky - Riley West (-15.1 adjusted passer rating) 108. Ole Miss - Justice Watkins (-15.14 adjusted passer rating) 109. Iowa State - Vaughn Sheppard (-15.66 adjusted passer rating) 110. Harvard - Mateo Gustavo (-16.6 adjusted passer rating) 111. Texas State - David O'Rourke (-17.01 adjusted passer rating) 112. Troy - Jose Lynn (-17.13 adjusted passer rating) 113. Colorado State - Wesley Brady (-17.72 adjusted passer rating) 114. Louisiana-Monroe - Martin Johnson (-18.87 adjusted passer rating) 115. Tulane - Multiple Passers (-19.02 adjusted passer rating) 116. Youngstown State - Brad McCaffrey (-20.66 adjusted passer rating) 117. New Hampshire - Jack Mayberry (-21.56 adjusted passer rating) 118. Buffalo - Levi Thompson (-22.12 adjusted passer rating) 119. Wyoming - Raphael Castle-Camp (-22.61 adjusted passer rating) 120. Boston College - Multiple Passers (-22.87 adjusted passer rating) 121. Wisconsin - Nathan Abrams (-24.51 adjusted passer rating) 122. Delaware - Jeffrey Guzman (-24.71 adjusted passer rating) 123. Louisiana-Lafayette - Multiple Passers (-25.79 adjusted passer rating) 124. Coastal Carolina - Roger Reese (-27.29 adjusted passer rating) 125. Georgia Southern - Ian Sorenson (-27.52 adjusted passer rating) 126. Utah - James Coulter (-27.56 adjusted passer rating) 127. Florida Atlantic - Gregory Crowder (-30.02 adjusted passer rating) 128. Georgia State - Zachary Mattson (-31.37 adjusted passer rating) 129. UNLV - Benjamin Jacobson (-33.26 adjusted passer rating) 130. Liberty - Oswaldo Stevenson (-33.37 adjusted passer rating) 131. Iowa - Otto Kirkland (-33.96 adjusted passer rating) 132. Arizona - Adam Slone (-35.34 adjusted passer rating) 133. Louisiana Tech - Khalil Simpkins (-36.22 adjusted passer rating) 134. Utah State - Kieron Farmer (-36.27 adjusted passer rating) 135. Marshall - Multiple Passers (-38.28 adjusted passer rating) 136. Ball State - Multiple Passers (-39.1 adjusted passer rating) 137. Montana - Gabriel Gage (-39.63 adjusted passer rating) 138. Kent State - Multiple Passers (-45.61 adjusted passer rating) 139. Appalachian State - Hernando Cortez (-47.92 adjusted passer rating) 140. New Mexico State - Multiple Passers (-50.63 adjusted passer rating) 141. South Dakota State - Calvin Koehler (-52.97 adjusted passer rating) 142. UMass - Pita Ponifasio (-68.26 adjusted passer rating) Opponent-Adjusted Passer Rating Allowed 1. Tennessee (-42.96 adjusted passer rating allowed) 2. Alabama (-35.02 adjusted passer rating allowed) 3. Virginia Tech (-30.8 adjusted passer rating allowed) 4. TCU (-30.3 adjusted passer rating allowed) 5. BYU (-30.19 adjusted passer rating allowed) 6. Oklahoma (-28.36 adjusted passer rating allowed) 7. Illinois (-26.81 adjusted passer rating allowed) 8. Penn State (-26.55 adjusted passer rating allowed) 9. Arizona (-25.69 adjusted passer rating allowed) 10. Georgia (-24.86 adjusted passer rating allowed) 11. Duke (-24.64 adjusted passer rating allowed) 12. Auburn (-23.74 adjusted passer rating allowed) 13. Pittsburgh (-23.69 adjusted passer rating allowed) 14. Oklahoma State (-23.13 adjusted passer rating allowed) 15. Purdue (-22.41 adjusted passer rating allowed) 16. Clemson (-21.37 adjusted passer rating allowed) 17. Virginia (-21.34 adjusted passer rating allowed) 18. Florida State (-21.32 adjusted passer rating allowed) 19. Texas (-20.89 adjusted passer rating allowed) 20. Texas A&M (-20.13 adjusted passer rating allowed) 21. Oregon (-19.07 adjusted passer rating allowed) 22. USC (-18.85 adjusted passer rating allowed) 23. LSU (-18.56 adjusted passer rating allowed) 24. East Carolina (-17.47 adjusted passer rating allowed) 25. Navy (-16.75 adjusted passer rating allowed) 26. South Dakota State (-15.97 adjusted passer rating allowed) 27. Kentucky (-15.96 adjusted passer rating allowed) 28. Missouri (-15.9 adjusted passer rating allowed) 29. Nevada (-15.61 adjusted passer rating allowed) 30. UTSA (-15.4 adjusted passer rating allowed) 31. Rice (-15.18 adjusted passer rating allowed) 32. Mississippi State (-13.7 adjusted passer rating allowed) 33. SMU (-13.57 adjusted passer rating allowed) 34. Hawaii (-13.27 adjusted passer rating allowed) 35. Michigan (-13.25 adjusted passer rating allowed) 36. UAB (-12.87 adjusted passer rating allowed) 37. Michigan State (-12.85 adjusted passer rating allowed) 38. Florida (-12.59 adjusted passer rating allowed) 39. North Dakota State (-11.63 adjusted passer rating allowed) 40. Nebraska (-11.2 adjusted passer rating allowed) 41. Miami (FL) (-10.8 adjusted passer rating allowed) 42. Notre Dame (-10.59 adjusted passer rating allowed) 43. West Virginia (-10.1 adjusted passer rating allowed) 44. Toledo (-9.98 adjusted passer rating allowed) 45. Washington (-9.27 adjusted passer rating allowed) 46. Stanford (-9.02 adjusted passer rating allowed) 47. Memphis (-8.4 adjusted passer rating allowed) 48. UTEP (-7.46 adjusted passer rating allowed) 49. NC State (-6.66 adjusted passer rating allowed) 50. Colorado (-6.61 adjusted passer rating allowed) 51. Texas Tech (-6.34 adjusted passer rating allowed) 52. Kansas (-6.3 adjusted passer rating allowed) 53. South Alabama (-6 adjusted passer rating allowed) 54. Florida International (-5.75 adjusted passer rating allowed) 55. Southern Miss (-5.62 adjusted passer rating allowed) 56. North Texas (-5.44 adjusted passer rating allowed) 57. Air Force (-4.43 adjusted passer rating allowed) 58. Central Michigan (-4.32 adjusted passer rating allowed) 59. Boston College (-4.22 adjusted passer rating allowed) 60. Northwestern (-3.62 adjusted passer rating allowed) 61. San Diego State (-3.41 adjusted passer rating allowed) 62. Northern Illinois (-2.88 adjusted passer rating allowed) 63. Vanderbilt (-2.57 adjusted passer rating allowed) 64. UCLA (-1.88 adjusted passer rating allowed) 65. Louisiana Tech (-0.75 adjusted passer rating allowed) 66. Arkansas State (-0.74 adjusted passer rating allowed) 67. Ohio State (-0.31 adjusted passer rating allowed) 68. Wisconsin (-0.25 adjusted passer rating allowed) 69. Army (+0.09 adjusted passer rating allowed) 70. Louisville (+0.12 adjusted passer rating allowed) 71. USF (+0.13 adjusted passer rating allowed) 72. Ole Miss (+0.38 adjusted passer rating allowed) 73. California (+0.7 adjusted passer rating allowed) 74. Temple (+1.12 adjusted passer rating allowed) 75. Baylor (+1.22 adjusted passer rating allowed) 76. Cincinnati (+1.69 adjusted passer rating allowed) 77. Maryland (+1.81 adjusted passer rating allowed) 78. Illinois State (+1.84 adjusted passer rating allowed) 79. Coastal Carolina (+2.53 adjusted passer rating allowed) 80. Kansas State (+2.63 adjusted passer rating allowed) 81. Rutgers (+2.63 adjusted passer rating allowed) 82. Houston (+2.95 adjusted passer rating allowed) 83. Indiana (+3.51 adjusted passer rating allowed) 84. Minnesota (+3.63 adjusted passer rating allowed) 85. James Madison (+3.65 adjusted passer rating allowed) 86. UCF (+3.73 adjusted passer rating allowed) 87. Utah (+3.84 adjusted passer rating allowed) 88. Old Dominion (+3.87 adjusted passer rating allowed) 89. North Dakota (+4.03 adjusted passer rating allowed) 90. Ball State (+4.08 adjusted passer rating allowed) 91. Arizona State (+4.41 adjusted passer rating allowed) 92. South Carolina (+4.64 adjusted passer rating allowed) 93. Western Michigan (+4.91 adjusted passer rating allowed) 94. Eastern Washington (+5.05 adjusted passer rating allowed) 95. Northern Iowa (+5.55 adjusted passer rating allowed) 96. Middle Tennessee (+5.98 adjusted passer rating allowed) 97. Miami (OH) (+6.09 adjusted passer rating allowed) 98. Syracuse (+6.15 adjusted passer rating allowed) 99. Georgia Tech (+6.22 adjusted passer rating allowed) 100. Boise State (+6.5 adjusted passer rating allowed) 101. Colorado State (+7.45 adjusted passer rating allowed) 102. Kent State (+7.67 adjusted passer rating allowed) 103. Arkansas (+7.73 adjusted passer rating allowed) 104. Oregon State (+7.82 adjusted passer rating allowed) 105. Eastern Michigan (+7.88 adjusted passer rating allowed) 106. Wake Forest (+8.16 adjusted passer rating allowed) 107. Florida Atlantic (+8.78 adjusted passer rating allowed) 108. UNLV (+9.42 adjusted passer rating allowed) 109. Tulsa (+9.99 adjusted passer rating allowed) 110. Akron (+10.47 adjusted passer rating allowed) 111. Delaware (+10.98 adjusted passer rating allowed) 112. Fresno State (+11.18 adjusted passer rating allowed) 113. Ohio (+11.53 adjusted passer rating allowed) 114. North Carolina (+12.39 adjusted passer rating allowed) 115. Georgia State (+12.64 adjusted passer rating allowed) 116. Buffalo (+15.44 adjusted passer rating allowed) 117. New Hampshire (+15.62 adjusted passer rating allowed) 118. Utah State (+16.26 adjusted passer rating allowed) 119. Troy (+16.29 adjusted passer rating allowed) 120. Louisiana-Lafayette (+16.72 adjusted passer rating allowed) 121. Tulane (+16.85 adjusted passer rating allowed) 122. Bowling Green (+17.14 adjusted passer rating allowed) 123. Charlotte (+17.52 adjusted passer rating allowed) 124. Louisiana-Monroe (+19.73 adjusted passer rating allowed) 125. Western Kentucky (+19.81 adjusted passer rating allowed) 126. Washington State (+20.1 adjusted passer rating allowed) 127. Harvard (+20.5 adjusted passer rating allowed) 128. Iowa (+21.82 adjusted passer rating allowed) 129. San Jose State (+21.97 adjusted passer rating allowed) 130. Texas State (+22.52 adjusted passer rating allowed) 131. Appalachian State (+24.66 adjusted passer rating allowed) 132. Iowa State (+26.45 adjusted passer rating allowed) 133. Youngstown State (+28.57 adjusted passer rating allowed) 134. Montana (+32.14 adjusted passer rating allowed) 135. New Mexico (+32.99 adjusted passer rating allowed) 136. Georgia Southern (+33.55 adjusted passer rating allowed) 137. Wyoming (+33.83 adjusted passer rating allowed) 138. Connecticut (+37.1 adjusted passer rating allowed) 139. New Mexico State (+38.12 adjusted passer rating allowed) 140. Marshall (+47.89 adjusted passer rating allowed) 141. UMass (+51.01 adjusted passer rating allowed) 142. Liberty (+59.89 adjusted passer rating allowed)
  9. Here at Bad Online Football Amateurs, we're all about bringing you deep-cut, informative, and thought-provoking content. This is going to be the first in a series of posts that apply the same concept of adjusted margin of victory to individual and team stats--offensive and defensive, efficiency and volume, passing and rushing. We're going to start by taking a look at the quarterbacks around the country and their total volume of yardage per game--both in the air and on the ground (#ScramblersArePeopleToo). To compile this data, we took the game-by-game individual stats from @Jieret's consolidated statsheet, tallied the combined passing and rushing yardage for every quarterback in the country (we'll call it "quarterback yardage" for short), and matched them up to each game so that we would have yards gained and yards allowed by team. By comparing each team's quarterback yardage to their opponents' quarterback yardage allowed in other games ("adjusted quarterback yardage"), we have an additional tool in the toolbox to measure which quarterbacks have been the most productive in the country. We also have an additional tool in the toolbox to measure which defenses have been the best at shutting down opposing quarterbacks through the air and on the ground. As a note, this is purely a volume stat--and that's a feature, not a bug. Some players will be higher because they're good, some will be higher because they're used a ton, and some will be used a ton because they're good. We'll apply the same technique for efficiency stats in another edition of the series. This author believes BOFA those metrics to be valuable. All stats are through week 11. Adjusted Quarterback Yardage Gained 1. Stanford - Troy McMurray (+148.4 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 2. Mississippi State - Storm Whittaker (+135.3 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 3. Rice - Eric McLean (+123.3 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 4. North Dakota - Robbie Koehler (+119.3 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 5. Northwestern - E.J. McGuire (+109.9 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 6. Arkansas State - Eugene Salas (+104.6 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 7. Duke - Bryce Thompson (+97.7 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 8. Eastern Washington - Samuel Connor (+97.4 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 9. Clemson - Akiem Williams III (+93 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 10. Kentucky - Elijah McManus (+88 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 11. Georgia Tech - Josh Beckett (+87 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 12. Auburn - Marcus Black (+83.7 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 13. Michigan State - Isaac Tyson (+78.3 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 14. Washington - Jake Davis (+73.5 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 15. Virginia - Mike Lucas (+72.3 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 16. Central Michigan - Byron Suggs (+71.3 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 17. East Carolina - Kyler Wilson (+71 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 18. Hawaii - J.T. Youngblood (+70.1 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 19. Oklahoma State - Ian Baldwin (+69.9 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 20. Washington State - Bradley Hassan (+69.3 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 21. Minnesota - Robert Lynch (+68.1 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 22. San Diego State - David Edmondson (+67 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 23. Colorado State - Wesley Brady (+59.7 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 24. Northern Illinois - Charlie Sanford (+56.8 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 25. Texas A&M - Nathan Singletary (+56.3 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 26. UCLA - Aaron Harden (+56.2 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 27. Nevada - Jordan Godwin (+55.9 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 28. Charlotte - Chris Billings (+44.3 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 29. USC - Marc Lockwood (+43.3 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 30. Navy - Zach Lombardi (+42.8 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 31. James Madison - Multiple Passers (+42.5 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 32. Western Kentucky - Riley West (+41.6 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 33. Michigan - Evan Perkins (+41.1 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 34. BYU - Jabari Sneed (+40.3 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 35. North Dakota State - Zack McAllister (+38.4 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 36. Oklahoma - Eric Pope (+38.3 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 37. Miami (OH) - Zack Cera (+38.2 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 38. Ohio State - Matt Ballard (+37.5 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 39. Kansas - Christian Graham (+34.2 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 40. Tennessee - Adrian Goldson (+34 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 41. Oregon - Jason Baum (+33.9 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 42. Virginia Tech - Beckett Morrison (+33.2 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 43. Illinois - Jordan Harrison (+31.6 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 44. Notre Dame - Brendan Lange (+31 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 45. Pittsburgh - Messiah Winston (+30 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 46. Alabama - Linus Petty (+28.6 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 47. Tulsa - Charles Palmer (+26.5 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 48. TCU - Felix Luck (+26.4 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 49. Western Michigan - Chase Sims (+25.1 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 50. Syracuse - Connor McLean (+22.8 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 51. Kent State - Multiple Passers (+20.8 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 52. North Carolina - Mitchell Denton (+20.2 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 53. Louisiana-Monroe - Martin Johnson (+20 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 54. Florida International - Gavin Copeland (+19.5 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 55. Old Dominion - Dylan Hamlin (+16.8 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 56. Southern Miss - Alexander Cassidy (+16.8 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 57. West Virginia - Martin Lake (+16.4 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 58. SMU - Marcus Burden (+16.3 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 59. Colorado - Mike Naylor (+14.8 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 60. UAB - Elijah Currie-Madison (+13.5 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 61. Ohio - Austin Lowe (+13 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 62. Temple - Eli Siegel (+12.3 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 63. UTSA - Justin Radford (+11.2 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 64. Connecticut - Rob Andersen (+11 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 65. Eastern Michigan - Giovanni Shaw (+10.9 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 66. North Texas - Elias Noble (+9.6 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 67. Arkansas - Multiple Passers (+7.6 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 68. UCF - Dwayne Bennett (+7.5 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 69. Ole Miss - Justice Watkins (+6.3 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 70. Missouri - Travis Ricketts (+5.4 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 71. Purdue - Kyle Jefferson (+4.8 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 72. Middle Tennessee - Tim Pritchard (+4.3 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 73. Georgia - Zeke Burkett (+2 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 74. Army - Vince Larue (+1.2 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 75. Baylor - Caleb Olmsted (+0.6 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 76. Florida State - Brett England (-0.7 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 77. New Hampshire - Jack Mayberry (-2.2 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 78. Nebraska - Sean Connell (-3.2 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 79. LSU - Jamel Woodson (-4.1 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 80. San Jose State - Travis Clinton (-5.7 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 81. Florida - Darion Harrison (-6.2 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 82. Louisiana Tech - Khalil Simpkins (-9.4 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 83. Rutgers - Blair Sullivan (-10.4 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 84. California - Nick Ellison (-10.9 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 85. Kansas State - Julius Minnow (-11.5 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 86. Houston - Rickie Shaffer (-12 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 87. USF - Savion Ross (-12.9 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 88. Penn State - Dillon Sneed (-13.1 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 89. NC State - Jacob Eubanks (-14.7 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 90. Boise State - Ian Cannon (-14.8 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 91. Vanderbilt - Tyler Mackey (-14.9 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 92. Texas - Multiple Passers (-19.9 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 93. Maryland - Brian Andersen (-20.6 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 94. Tulane - Multiple Passers (-20.9 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 95. Delaware - Jeffrey Guzman (-21.9 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 96. Akron - Griffin Donahue (-22 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 97. South Alabama - Rafael Higgins (-22.6 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 98. Youngstown State - Brad McCaffrey (-22.6 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 99. Louisville - Nick Carr (-23.7 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 100. Illinois State - Phillip Stephenson (-24.2 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 101. Florida Atlantic - Gregory Crowder (-25 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 102. Air Force - Multiple Passers (-25.6 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 103. Wake Forest - James Betts (-26.5 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 104. UTEP - Darnell Prince (-26.6 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 105. Cincinnati - Dillon Schaeffer (-27.1 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 106. Memphis - Cooper Spillman (-27.3 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 107. South Carolina - Aidan Peters (-27.7 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 108. Indiana - Rangi Grey (-32.8 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 109. Oregon State - Eli Sherrill (-33.7 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 110. Boston College - Multiple Passers (-37.9 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 111. Arizona State - Multiple Passers (-38.4 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 112. Fresno State - Teddy Cagle (-41.4 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 113. Georgia State - Zachary Mattson (-43.7 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 114. Troy - Jose Lynn (-47.4 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 115. Bowling Green - A.J. Coyne (-48.2 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 116. Toledo - Multiple Passers (-50.9 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 117. Utah State - Kieron Farmer (-51.9 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 118. Louisiana-Lafayette - Multiple Passers (-51.9 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 119. Iowa - Otto Kirkland (-52.8 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 120. Georgia Southern - Ian Sorenson (-53.1 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 121. UNLV - Benjamin Jacobson (-56.9 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 122. Coastal Carolina - Roger Reese (-71.2 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 123. Wyoming - Raphael Castle-Camp (-72.7 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 124. Miami (FL) - Jason Ledford (-73.9 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 125. Wisconsin - Nathan Abrams (-79.1 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 126. Iowa State - Vaughn Sheppard (-80.9 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 127. Utah - James Coulter (-86.3 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 128. Texas State - David O'Rourke (-86.4 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 129. South Dakota State - Calvin Koehler (-87.2 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 130. Appalachian State - Hernando Cortez (-87.8 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 131. Northern Iowa - Jameson Beckwith (-94.8 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 132. Montana - Gabriel Gage (-96.5 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 133. New Mexico - Riley Head (-100 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 134. Arizona - Adam Slone (-100.4 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 135. New Mexico State - Multiple Passers (-103.1 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 136. Ball State - Multiple Passers (-108.8 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 137. UMass - Pita Ponifasio (-118 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 138. Buffalo - Levi Thompson (-125.4 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 139. Texas Tech - Donald Garrett (-127.1 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 140. Harvard - Mateo Gustavo (-133.8 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 141. Liberty - Oswaldo Stevenson (-147.7 adjusted quarterback yards per game) 142. Marshall - Multiple Passers (-171.3 adjusted quarterback yards per game) Adjusted Quarterback Yardage Allowed 1. Tennessee (-71.61 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 2. Alabama (-71.03 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 3. Clemson (-65.92 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 4. Oklahoma State (-62.44 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 5. Virginia Tech (-51.02 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 6. Ball State (-50.14 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 7. Georgia (-48.85 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 8. Northwestern (-42.84 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 9. Missouri (-42.04 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 10. Arizona (-40.97 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 11. Rice (-38.29 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 12. BYU (-38.18 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 13. Toledo (-38.03 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 14. Purdue (-38.01 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 15. Kentucky (-37.23 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 16. Oklahoma (-36.57 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 17. Florida State (-35.49 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 18. Duke (-35.02 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 19. Illinois (-34.33 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 20. TCU (-32.51 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 21. Pittsburgh (-32.24 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 22. Louisville (-31.71 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 23. Mississippi State (-30.61 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 24. Oregon (-27.53 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 25. Michigan (-26.63 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 26. Texas (-26.25 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 27. Texas A&M (-25.86 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 28. Notre Dame (-25.84 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 29. LSU (-25.47 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 30. UAB (-23.94 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 31. Hawaii (-22.08 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 32. UTEP (-20.81 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 33. NC State (-20.81 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 34. Nebraska (-20.09 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 35. North Dakota State (-19.49 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 36. South Dakota State (-19.3 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 37. Penn State (-17.87 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 38. UCLA (-16.72 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 39. West Virginia (-16.44 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 40. Rutgers (-16.24 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 41. USC (-16.24 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 42. Texas Tech (-15.89 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 43. Auburn (-13.48 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 44. Miami (OH) (-13.05 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 45. Washington (-12.08 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 46. Navy (-10.98 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 47. Ohio (-10.53 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 48. Nevada (-10.23 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 49. Stanford (-9.5 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 50. Louisiana Tech (-8.86 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 51. USF (-8.74 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 52. Georgia Tech (-8.28 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 53. Southern Miss (-8.15 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 54. Miami (FL) (-7.55 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 55. Akron (-7.4 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 56. East Carolina (-6.87 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 57. Wisconsin (-6.65 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 58. Michigan State (-6.05 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 59. Northern Illinois (-5.79 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 60. Temple (-5.54 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 61. California (-5.53 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 62. Kansas (-4.9 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 63. Ole Miss (-4.43 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 64. Colorado (-4.34 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 65. Florida International (-4.29 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 66. SMU (-4.13 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 67. South Carolina (-3.53 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 68. Central Michigan (-3.27 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 69. San Diego State (-2.63 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 70. UTSA (-2.3 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 71. Illinois State (-2.24 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 72. Virginia (-2.12 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 73. Arkansas State (-1.88 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 74. South Alabama (-1.79 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 75. Florida (-1.21 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 76. UCF (-1.16 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 77. Baylor (-1.05 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 78. Maryland (+0.56 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 79. Georgia State (+0.68 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 80. Utah (+1.55 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 81. Northern Iowa (+1.66 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 82. Memphis (+2.16 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 83. Indiana (+2.84 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 84. Houston (+2.9 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 85. Boise State (+3.34 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 86. Old Dominion (+3.79 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 87. Delaware (+4.49 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 88. Vanderbilt (+5.48 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 89. North Texas (+5.66 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 90. Oregon State (+5.79 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 91. Arizona State (+6.24 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 92. Air Force (+7.38 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 93. Middle Tennessee (+7.71 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 94. Colorado State (+7.76 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 95. Boston College (+9.24 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 96. Eastern Washington (+11.13 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 97. Tulsa (+11.15 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 98. North Dakota (+11.7 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 99. Ohio State (+11.77 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 100. Western Michigan (+13.05 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 101. Cincinnati (+13.77 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 102. Arkansas (+14.82 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 103. Utah State (+14.94 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 104. UNLV (+15.19 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 105. Minnesota (+18.16 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 106. Texas State (+18.16 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 107. Coastal Carolina (+18.31 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 108. James Madison (+18.84 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 109. Syracuse (+22.59 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 110. Kansas State (+23.09 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 111. Fresno State (+23.09 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 112. North Carolina (+24.59 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 113. Wake Forest (+25.46 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 114. Florida Atlantic (+26.53 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 115. Charlotte (+26.94 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 116. Army (+27.17 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 117. Washington State (+28.57 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 118. Iowa (+29.03 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 119. Western Kentucky (+29.05 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 120. Eastern Michigan (+29.84 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 121. Tulane (+30.16 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 122. Kent State (+30.42 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 123. Troy (+33.35 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 124. Harvard (+36.32 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 125. San Jose State (+37.48 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 126. Louisiana-Lafayette (+39.01 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 127. Appalachian State (+39.67 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 128. Louisiana-Monroe (+39.68 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 129. Iowa State (+40.1 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 130. Montana (+41.05 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 131. Buffalo (+41.96 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 132. Youngstown State (+42.3 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 133. UMass (+43.68 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 134. New Hampshire (+44.91 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 135. New Mexico State (+46.05 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 136. Marshall (+49.02 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 137. Bowling Green (+49.71 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 138. Georgia Southern (+55.55 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 139. Wyoming (+56 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 140. New Mexico (+56.88 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 141. Connecticut (+60.8 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game) 142. Liberty (+138.04 adjusted quarterback yards allowed per game)
  10. After a chaotic week 10, things calmed down significantly in week 11. The teams expected to win by a lot all won by a lot; the one game expected to be a toss-up ended up being a one-possession game. The results leave the Big XII with four teams that are definitely headed to bowl games, two teams that are likely heading home for the winter after week 16, and four teams that are within two wins of a postseason bid--and there's only one game between members of that third group, so anywhere from zero to all four could find themselves in a bowl. After a week of order, let's talk about the games. Friday Night Baylor 31, Iowa State 20 Bearing Down: It didn't take very long for Baylor to fall behind in this one, as Iowa State jumped out to a 14-7 lead at the end of the first quarter. It took a whole lot longer for them to get back on track and ultimately take the lead, but when things started to click they ended up winning this one going away. Caleb Olmsted had his best game in a while, snapping a streak of four straight games with an interception and a completion percentage of 60% or worse. He finished the day with 208 yards and a touchdown on 17-of-27 passing, with an additional 29 yards on the ground. Miles Street added 100 yards and 2 scores (including the go-ahead touchdown in the fourth quarter) on 21 carries for the Bears--it's the first time in more than a full season that he's hit 100 yards and 2 touchdowns without a fumble in a given game. Eating His Wheaties: Something has gotten into Baylor cornerback William Travis, who apparently thinks he's Big XII career interceptions leader Kyle Cunningham now. He picked off Vaughn Sheppard in the fourth quarter for his sixth interception of the season so far (and the second game in a row), which puts him back in front of Devon Braxton for first place in the Big XII. He's now matched Cunningham's sophomore season for 3rd place on Baylor's single-season picks list. It also means he's one interception off of matching the school record--which is shared by Cunningham's freshman season and Cunningham's junior season. (Kyle Cunningham was really good, okay?) Perhaps Lamont Wilder (2 receptions for 35 yards, 1 drop) should have what Travis is having. Two-Way Clay: Iowa State redshirt freshman Demetrius Clay was recruited out of high school primarily as a blocking-first tight end, but the all-around athlete made quite an impact with his hand in the dirt on the other side of the line of scrimmage. He had three tackles for loss on Saturday, vaulting himself into the team lead with 5 on the season. Taua Aloese is the only other Cyclone with at least three tackles for loss all season, for reference. At this point, Clay may well be making a larger impact on defense than on offense--he now has more tackles for loss this season (5) than receptions (4). Next Up: Iowa State drops its sixth straight game, falling to 1-7 (0-6) and out of bowl eligibility for the third consecutive season. They'll still have chances to make something out of their season, but they step out of conference to play Virginia Tech next and that won't make things any easier. Baylor improves to 4-5 (3-3); they get a bye before they hit a closing stretch that starts with Oklahoma at home. Saturday Afternoon #7 Oklahoma 49, Kansas State 3 Solaris: This game got out of hand early, as Oklahoma's offense was able to create just about anything it wanted--almost as if it were working with the memories of Kansas State-Oklahoma matchups of years ago. Maurice White was back to being unstoppable, tallying up 140 yards and 2 touchdowns on 20 carries. But the star of the show was quarterback Eric Pope, who made play after play all day long. He finished 21-of-29 for 250 yards and 3 touchdowns through the air, then added 57 yards and a touchdown on the ground as well. His three passing touchdowns and four total touchdowns match the career-highs he set against Kansas earlier this season; something about playing the Sunflower State must have buoyed him as if he were in zero-gravity. The Mirror: For Kansas State, finding any room to maneuver on offense against their foes in red proved mostly fruitless. Running the ball was a non-starter: Jaiden Givens finished the day with just 13 yards on 7 carries. Throwing the ball yielded only the occasional success. Julius Minnow was sacked 3 times (twice by Jeremiah Melvin, once by Max Abel) and didn't fare well even when he had time to throw it. He finished 12-of-26 for 130 yards and 2 interceptions--and three more of those incompletions were the results of pass breakups by Andrew Reaves and Elijah Williams. They finished 1-of-10 on third down and managed a single 38-yard field goal in the third quarter to avoid a shutout. Stalker: Oklahoma has pursued punt after punt this season, painstakingly tracing the path thereto. For the second time, they crashed into the zone and got their wish. It was Chase Reardon this time who got a hand on the ball and nearly bowled over Kansas State punter Levi Whelan in the process. Reardon then beat Whelan to the ball, falling on top of it in the endzone for a touchdown that put Oklahoma up 21-0 in the second quarter and essentially put the rest of the game out of reach. Next Up: Kansas State drops its fifth straight to fall to 2-6 (0-5) and is on the brink of joining Iowa State in bowl-ineligibility. They go to Austin next to try to stay alive. Oklahoma impressively shakes off the TCU loss, improves to 8-1 (5-1), and now goes on bye before a pair of possible trap games against Baylor and West Virginia. #17 Oklahoma State 27, Texas 9 Battering Am: Amral Brown only needed 16 carries to be the most impactful player on either side of the ball on either team on Saturday. Despite the light workload, he finished the day with 136 rushing yards and a career-high-tying 3 touchdowns. The 8.5 yards he averaged per carry not only set a career-best, but it was also the second-highest average for a Big XII runningback (min. 10 carries) all season--the only better performance along that line was of course Solomon McLaughlin's 300-yard game against South Alabama. It's the 15th time overall and just the third time since the start of the 2020 season that a Big XII runningback has rushed for at least 3 touchdowns on 8.5 yards or more per carry. Texas just couldn't find a way to get to him before the line of scrimmage, and they struggled to bring him down afterward anyway. DEFCON 2: Two weeks ago, Texas was at DEFCON 3. This loss takes them down another level--not solely because it was their fourth straight, but because it was a second straight blowout in which they failed to score a touchdown. Part of that was bad luck: Simeon Wells rushed for 102 yards on 20 carries, but the Longhorns stalled in opposing territory over and over again. They attempted five field goals (Devin Bollinger made just three of them) and Kyler Tackett threw an interception in the endzone that cut out one of the Longhorns' more promising drives. They're now averaging just 19.5 points per game, which ranks 120th in the country. They still have an identifiable path to six wins, but not appreciably more than that. Passing Brown: The one bit of good news for the Texas offense is that Simeon Wells passed Sterling Brown for the school career rushing yardage record. He finished the game with 5,295 career yards to Brown's 5,239. He's second on the Big XII career list to fellow senior Maurice White, and he remains about 200 yards ahead of junior Solomon McLaughlin. A Bit Out of Sync?: This might be nitpicky in the midst of a dominant 27-9 win, but Ian Baldwin seems to have cooled off quite a bit over these past three games or so. He was bad against TCU, but everyone is bad against TCU. He was good against Iowa State, though not quite as good as he normally was: he completed 66.7% of his passes, but he set a season-low for passing yardage. Then against Texas, he looked a lot like he did against TCU without the interceptions. He finished 19-of-36 for 235 yards with neither a score nor a pick, which actually amounts to his lowest passer rating of the season. It's too early to call it a slump and may well turn out to be nothing in particular. But it means Oklahoma State's not at his best. As a side note: if this isn't Oklahoma State's best and they could still beat Texas by 18, then this team's ceiling remains quite high if and when Baldwin returns to full form. Next Up: Texas's fourth straight loss drops them to 4-4 (3-3) and means that their game against Kansas State next week becomes a must-win. It's usually a game they've been able to count on, but they need to find a cure for their offensive ailments fast. Oklahoma State improves to 6-2 (3-2) and becomes the fourth Big XII team to secure bowl-eligibility this season. They will head to Lawrence next to try to stay alive in the Big XII Championship Game hunt. #22 Texas Tech 16, West Virginia 10 Don't Call It A Comeback: Remember that little slump Solomon McLaughlin was in a few games ago? Yeah, neither does he. The Heisman contender finished his day with 155 yards on 27 carries (5.7 yards per rush) with 2 touchdowns--it's his third consecutive game with at least 125 yards, 2 touchdowns, and 5.0 yards per carry or more. It's also his fourth 150-yard performance of the season and 35th 100-yard effort in 35 career games. He has now crossed the 5,000-yard mark for his career, has scored his 68th rushing touchdown, and is now 145 yards and 7 touchdowns behind Sterling Brown for 3rd and 1st place, respectively, on the Big XII career lists. You Can Dance If You Want To: Texas Tech defenders Ralph McAdams and Curtis Jones both had big days, which corresponds to how well the defense played in holding West Virginia to 10 points for the day. Jones had 2 tackles and a sack on the day--but the big news was that it was his 20th career sack, therefore putting him ahead of the legendary Jeremy Miller to set the Texas Tech school record. He's the third Big XII player to hit that mark; Hudson Adam and Anthony Ortiz co-own the conference record with 23. More impactful on the game was Ralph McAdams, who had 5 total tackles and whose sack came on 3rd and long in West Virginia's own endzone for a safety. While that didn't change the fact that West Virginia needed a touchdown at that point, it did give the Red Raiders the ball back--and with McLaughlin shouldering the load, they could begin to run down the clock until kneeldown time. Shutdown: West Virginia's offense has been showing signs of struggle lately (with the defense and special teams carrying the load), but things broke down pretty thoroughly on that side of the ball for the Mountaineers against a physically demanding Texas Tech defense. Bryce Madison picked up a career-low 45 yards on 15 carries; he's been held under 70 yards six times in eight games this season, including three games straight. But West Virginia's learned to live with that; they just haven't been able to account for Martin Lake having a bad game. He finished 14-of-27 for a career-low 130 yards, 1 touchdown, and 1 interception. His 97.1 passer rating was the lowest of his burgeoning career as well, and it was his third straight game with exactly 1 touchdown and 1 interception. And after Trevor Brink's kicking struggles were a difference-maker against Baylor, so were the struggles of freshman Mario Bales in this one--Bales went 1-for-3 with misses from 44 and 46. Next Up: The stakes just got higher for West Virginia, who drops to 4-4 (2-3) with the toughest part of their schedule only just beginning. They next get a visit from a TCU defense that is perhaps the worst possible antidote to offensive struggle. Texas Tech shakes off their loss to Kansas and improves to 7-2 (4-2) for their fifth consecutive season with at least 7 wins; they get a bye before hosting Texas in pursuit of their best season since 2018 (or even since 2015). Byes: Kansas (4-4), #3 TCU (7-1)
  11. stormstopper

    [2022] Week #11 - 1 PM

  12. stormstopper

    [2022] Week #11 - Saturday Evening

    I dunno, I'm a coach so I'm not exactly eligible for the Heis...DANG IT, I WAS STORM FIRST, HIS NAME IS WHITTAKER
  13. stormstopper

    [2022] Week #11 - Saturday Evening

    Duke now has the best point differential in the country at +21.67 per game. It seems exceedingly likely that the ACCCG will be Clemson-Duke now. Both teams' magic number is two; Clemson can do it all at once against Syracuse next week. Duke needs two wins out of three against Syracuse, Wake, and UNC.
  14. stormstopper

    [2022] Week #11 - Saturday Afternoon

    Oklahoma has two punt blocks returned for touchdowns this season. Really good special teams unit.
  15. stormstopper

    [2022] Mid-Season Re-signings

    Da Bears are ready
  16. Last week's events shook things up in the nation's most exciting conference, and barely has the dust had time to settle before we all get back together for another week of Big XII football. There are some big questions to be answered in this following at. Can Baylor turn its win into momentum, or will Iowa State answer with their backs to the wall? Will Oklahoma do to Kansas State what Oklahoma does to Kansas State? Will Texas halt its freefall in Stillwater against a business-as-usual Oklahoma State? And who between West Virginia and Texas Tech will recover first from the upsets of last week? I can't wait to find out, so let's talk about the games. Friday Night Baylor (3-5) at Iowa State (1-6) (+6.5)* With their backs against the wall last week, Baylor snapped a three-game skid and poured ice water over a hot West Virginia team to stay alive at least a bit longer. On Friday night, one of two things will happen: either the Bears will make it two in a row and claw within a game of .500, or Iowa State will replicate Baylor's feat to stave off bowl elimination for at least another week. Who will pull it off? There's a good chance that the answer to that question hinges on whether or not Iowa State can pierce a Baylor run defense that's been on its game lately. Against Kansas, TCU, and West Virginia, the Bears have given up just 72.7 rushing yards per game on 3.6 yards per carry. None of the runningbacks they faced are Kofi McCullough, however. The sophomore is averaging 109.9 yards a game on 5.2 yards per carry, he's scored 8 touchdowns, and he's had to become more and more of the offense as quarterback Vaughn Sheppard has struggled. Baylor's had great production from their defensive line, aided and abetted by an elite set of linebackers--in other words, they can fill gaps, set the edge, and keep speedy guys like McCullough from getting to the outside. Iowa State will have to identify where Zachary McHale (5 TFL, 1.0 sack, 1 INT, 2 PD, 28 tackles) and Charles Brock (8 TFL, 6.5 sacks, 26 tackles) are on every play and figure out how to prevent their involvement. If they can't establish the run, this game's over before it begins. The other side of the ball is more difficult to get a good grasp on. Iowa State has struggled to get stops; their 33.3 points allowed per game ranks 134th in the country--just ahead of winless Marshall. Iowa and Texas Tech are the only opponents not to score 30 on them. But Baylor's been held to 20 or fewer in four consecutive games, and their offense was operating in fits and starts even in last week's win. Caleb Olmsted's completing 58.1% of his passes with 10 touchdowns to 9 interceptions; he's 9th in the Big XII in passer rating and ahead of only Vaughn Sheppard. Something's got to give. And the player Baylor hopes will take what's given is Lamont Wilder. Sure, Curtis Sheppard might lead the team in receiving yards, but throwing into the slot where either Mark Barbour or Laurent Daniel will be lying in wait just sounds like a bad idea. Instead, Wilder has the opportunity to make plays on the boundary against a set of really weak Cyclone corners. Yards after catch await. While last week proved that anything can happen, it would take a lot for Iowa State to snatch this game away. They'd need to get some pressure in the backfield, something they haven't done much of this season. They'd need to run against a solid (or at least solid-acting) Baylor run defense. They'd probably even need to get just a few good throws from Vaughn Sheppard. Doing all three of those things simultaneously is a lot to ask, and I don't think Baylor will allow Iowa State to answer that. Baylor 31, Iowa State 17 Saturday Afternoon #7 Oklahoma (7-1) at Kansas State (2-5) (+19)* Kansas State has tried eight times in eight seasons to defeat Oklahoma. Sometimes, it's gone poorly, such as the 227-69 margin that the Sooners racked up against the Wildcats in the first six meetings from 2014-2019. Recently, it's gone a good bit less poorly, such as the time that Oklahoma stymied Kansas State in a 29-26 overtime win in 2020...or the time that Oklahoma stymied Kansas State by an identical score of 29-26 in overtime the following year. Those near-misses came against 7-6 Oklahoma teams, though, and several of the blowout losses came against Sooner teams that look a lot more like the one that's torn through every opponent not named TCU. It wouldn't be the nation's most exciting conference if every outcome were preordained. Maybe purple is Oklahoma's weakness. Maybe Kansas State will come out extra motivated after two heartbreaking losses to Oklahoma. Maybe for one day, everything will go right for the Wildcats while everything goes wrong for the Sooners. And maybe none of that will happen and Oklahoma will cruise. But we won't find out until Saturday. For Oklahoma, key number one is going to be getting the offense back on track. At 35.4 points per game, they rank 6th in the whole country in scoring. They scored 30 or more points in six of their first seven games including a pair of 52-point efforts--and then TCU held them to 16 in Norman. Eric Pope is no longer on a Brooksheerian pace due to his struggles against the Frogs, but he's still completing 66.2% of his passes for 227.3 yards per game, 16 touchdowns to 5 interceptions, and a 159.3 passer rating. And Maurice White's worst career game means he has fallen off of his pursuit of the pace Solomon McLaughlin was setting, but he's still averaging more than 6.1 yards per carry with 137.4 yards per game (that's 1099 total) and 12 rushing touchdowns without a lost fumble. They'll go up against a Kansas State defense that hasn't made much happen since conference play started. They're yielding 33.0 points per game in Big XII matchups, and Brendan Scherer (34 tackles, 6 TFL) has often had to play fireman. That won't work against an offense that can run, misdirect, and stretch the field horizontally and vertically as well as Oklahoma can. The Sooners make you defend 11-on-11, and if Kansas State can't do that then they're in trouble. That's also not something Kansas State can replicate on the other end. They get 62.3 yards per game on the ground from Jaiden Givens, and the rest of the offense is on the arm of Julius Minnow. The redshirt senior has been...okay. He's completing 58.8% of his passes with 12 touchdowns and 8 interceptions, and he's averaging 222.9 yards per game. He's got a good connection with junior Jhonny Palacios (459 yards, 5 TD), and he loves to find freshman Jermaine Jordan (team-high 499 yards, 2 TD) in the slot. Both will need to be on their game, though, because Oklahoma loves to drop into coverage and make it as difficult as possible to find an easy throw to make. That's going to be doubly true if Oklahoma decides it doesn't need to respect the Kansas State ground game and focuses on stopping Minnow. Six different Sooners have intercepted at least one pass this year, and both Elijah Williams and Julian Foster have batted down several more. Oklahoma's been playing better than Kansas State, and they match up better against them as well. I'll take the Sooners, and I think it'll look more like the first six wins than the more recent two. #7 Oklahoma 38, Kansas State 14 Texas (4-3) at #17 Oklahoma State (5-2) (-17.5)* It seems like such a long time ago that Texas was 4-0, ranked, and in the discussion for conference contention. Sure, their wins had been close (except for Iowa State), but the defense was shining and surely the offense would roar back into form with Kyler Tackett back under center, right? Since then, however, Texas has dropped three straight. No one was surprised that they lost close to TCU. It was a bit disappointing when they lost to Florida. Then came the Red River Shootout, and Texas looked lifeless in a 30-3 loss. The Longhorns have gone nearly six weeks without a win, and they're on shakier and shakier ground when it comes to bowl eligibility. Just like the past three years, they've built up enough of a foundation to be able to survive a slump--but anything that goes wrong could spell doom. Stealing a game in Stillwater would go a long way. To do that, though, they would have to figure out some way to get the nation's 109th-ranked scoring offense off the ground. Ironically, that would require being successful on the ground. Simeon Wells has been okay at best over the past five games. He's hit 100 yards on the ground just twice; one occasion was against Iowa State, and the other such effort lacked a touchdown and included a lost fumble. When he's off, so is Kyler Tackett--the senior is having the worst season of his career just about across-the-board. He's thrown just 6 touchdown passes against 4 interceptions, averages 188.4 yards per game, and is maintaining a 135.1 passer rating. This is an opportunity because Oklahoma State's defense has shown some elasticity. They gave up 38 to Texas Tech, 34 to Hawaii, and 28 to TCU--but when they have an overmatched opponent, they can be a vicegrip. That's a fate Texas has to avoid, because Oklahoma State's offense isn't the type to show signs of weakness (except against TCU). Amral Brown has scored twice as many rushing touchdowns as Simeon Wells, with nearly 200 more yards--on 3 more carries. Ian Baldwin averages nearly 100 more yards per game through the air than Kyler Tackett does, and he's doing so on 71.4% passing with 18 touchdowns to 4 interceptions. Texas has a few great defensive linemen and one of the best corners in the Big XII with Devon Braxton--but when Braxton's on Jeremy Bridges, who will be on Samuel Barfield? And vice versa? Maybe Texas can slow down Amral Brown, though nobody's been able to do so yet. Maybe Texas can get pressure on Baldwin and slow down one of his two primary targets on each play. But as long as he has enough time to get the ball out to the other one, he'll be fine. That's the trouble with playing Oklahoma State: they just have so many different ways to score, and you have to pick your poison. Texas's defense is no slouch at all; opponents average 5.5 fewer points per game against them, which is a top-30 mark in the country. But Oklahoma State will score on them anyway, and I don't think Texas has shown that they have the ability to keep up. Give me the Cowboys. #17 Oklahoma State 31, Texas 20 West Virginia (4-3) at #22 Texas Tech (6-2) (+0.5)* We finish the day with a bounceback game. Both of these teams are coming off of an unexpected home loss last week, but whoever wins will have the opportunity to shake it off as if nothing ever happened and get on with the rest of the season. Things won't get easy from here for either team, too, so that makes now as good a time as any to get back to playing the best football possible. Neither team has lost track of its baseline. West Virginia is still playing incredible defense, holding opponents to just 16.1 points per game to rank 7th in the country. Texas Tech is still running the ball early and often; Solomon McLaughlin's 1263 yards and 16 touchdowns lead the league (and on 6.0 yards per carry, to boot) while Hayden Dyer has added another 165 yards and 3 scores for himself. McLaughlin is on a 13-game pace of over 2,050 yards. But whoever can go beyond their bastion is likely going to have a leg up in this one. For West Virginia, that means finding consistency on offense. We haven't heard a lot of Bryce Madison's name this year; he's growing into his role and has only averaged 78.1 yards per game. It's been Martin Lake and Corey Easley who have stolen the show. It might be a bit early to say Easley's come back down to earth, but he's been held under 70 yards receiving in three of the last four games. (The exception was a 133-yard effort against Kansas State.) Martin Lake's been a bit all over the place against non-overmatched opponents. The only teams that haven't picked him off were Marshall and Kansas State, but he's also thrown a touchdown pass in every game he's played. On balance, he's completing 61.1% of his passes, averaging 234.7 yards per game, throwing 12 touchdowns to 5 picks, and adding 4 more scores on the ground. The better Easley gets and the more consistent Lake can be on a game-to-game basis, the more explosive West Virginia's offense can be. Meanwhile, Texas Tech hasn't found the defensive consistency it would like. They're capable on that end, and they're productive in the pass rush for sure. Curtis Jones has 7.0 sacks and 3 tackles for loss; Samir Sample has put up a nice line of 6.0 sacks and 9 TFL. But they've at times struggled in coverage. They're coming off of 319 yards and 4 touchdowns allowed to Christian Graham. They have 1 interception by a defensive back all season (it was nickel corner Chad Solomon); the rest come from their linebackers. West Virginia just has to buy time for Martin Lake, and he should have a shot to take advantage. But that's the problem: West Virginia's offensive line doesn't typically buy enough time for Lake (or Bryce Madison, for that matter). They've had the lowest-rated offensive line in the conference, with two true freshmen being the most talented players in the unit. Lake can use his feet to extend plays, but those so far haven't turned into positive plays on the ground this season. Sample and Jones should win their matchup against the Mountaineer line, and I think Texas Tech will exploit it just enough to come away with the win. #22 Texas Tech 23, West Virginia 20 Byes: Kansas (4-4), #3 TCU (7-1)
  17. stormstopper

    [2022] Week #11 - TNF

    The Seahawks now have as many wins as the rest of the NFC West combined. They're 2.5 games ahead of the second-place Cardinals (though only 2 in the loss column). Their remaining opponents are 20-37, which is the easiest remaining schedule in the league. And they're now projected for 8.2 wins, which is the first time that an NFC West team has been projected to finish above .500 since I started keeping track for this season--nobody else is projected above 5.1. I'm not saying it's time to write their name on the 4-line in Sharpie, but is there anybody left who wants to bet on someone else winning the division?
  18. stormstopper

    [CFBHC] Register your Initial Coaching Skills

    Base starting skills Offense: 11 Defense: 16 Special Teams: 9 Clock Mgmt:12 Discipline: 12 Youth Mgmt: 16 CFBHC Career: Kansas Jayhawks (2014-present) NFLHC Career: Cleveland Browns Owner (2014-2016), Chicago Bears Owner/GM (2017-present) Achievements: 2x Big XII Champion (2014, 2018) Breakdown: (Off/Def/ST/Clock/Disc./Youth) 2014 Adjustments: +1/+2/0/-1/-1/+1 Traits after 2014: 11/12/10/9/9/11 2015 Adjustments: -2/+2/+1/0/+1/0 Traits after 2015: 9/14/11/9/10/11 2016 Adjustments: 0/-1/-1/+2/0/+2 Traits after 2016: 9/13/10/11/10/13 2017 Adjustments: +1/+2/0/-1/+1/-1 Traits after 2017: 10/15/10/10/11/12 2018 Adjustments: +2/-1/-1/0/0/+2 Traits after 2018: 12/14/9/10/11/14 2019 Adjustments: -1/-1/+1/+1/0/+2 Traits after 2019: 11/13/10/11/11/16 2020 Adjustments: 0/+2/0/+2/-1/-1 Traits after 2020: 11/15/10/13/10/15 2021 Adjustments: 0/+1/-1/-1/+2/+1 Traits after 2021: 11/16/9/12/12/16
  19. Road upsets were abound nationwide, and the nation's most exciting conference was by no means left out. Baylor shook off a deep slump to upset West Virginia in Morgantown, and Kansas won its third straight by knocking off a ranked Texas Tech in Lubbock. While Oklahoma State just had to go and buck the trend with a fully expected home win over Iowa State, TCU notched the third and certainly the biggest road win in the Big XII this week with a 20-16 decision over previously undefeated and third-ranked Oklahoma. There's a lot to unpack here, so let's talk about the games. Saturday Morning Baylor 20, West Virginia 17 Running For Dear Life: Under pressure from the Baylor defense, the West Virginia offensive line bent, buckled, and ultimately broke. And with it, the offense as a whole struggled to get going. Bryce Madison on the ground was a non-starter, collecting 54 yards on 15 carries. Martin Lake was under pressure, sacked by both Charles Brock and Ezekiel Sewell. On one occasion he was able to scramble away from pressure for a 3-yard touchdown run, but more often he was simply forced to throw the ball away. Lake finished 21-of-34 for 207 yards with a touchdown and an interception, West Virginia converted 4-of-13 third downs (though their defense yielded the same), and they managed 17 points to match their lowest total of the season. Travis County Limits: Taking advantage of the Baylor pressure was cornerback William Travis, who snagged his 5th interception of the season to roar into a tie for first place in the Big XII with Devon Braxton. He's had a pick in all three wins Baylor has put together this season. Zachary McHale is the only other Bear to intercept a pass this season (against Kansas State), and he once again made an impact in this one with 6 tackles and a tackle for loss. With 190 yards, a touchdown, and an interception from Caleb Olmsted (plus 10 rushing yards) and 85 rushing yards from Miles Street, they needed the strong defensive effort to get over the top. Off the Brink: The Mountaineers still had a shot to win the game if a few things could have broken their way. A kicker never wins or loses a game on his own, but sometimes a kick or two is worth more than the margin of victory. In this case, the foot of Trevor Brink made a difference in the wrong way. He hit from 39 in the third quarter, but missed from 39 and 46 to fall to 5-of-11 on the year. The senior is likely headed to the bench in favor of true freshman Mario Bales after the unfortunate effort. Bee Gees and Kenny Loggins: Baylor's upset win means they're stayin' alive a little bit longer. They need to finish 3-1 with their remaining games coming against Iowa State, Oklahoma, Texas Tech, and Texas. That's still quite the feat to pull off, but it's something to play for. West Virginia, meanwhile, is suddenly in the danger zone after having been rolling for so long. They still only need two wins to go bowling--but now, they will need one against one of the four ranked teams they play in their final five games. Next Up: Baylor will try to make it back-to-back road wins next week as they take on Iowa State, who we'll talk about next. The Mountaineers also hit the road as they take on Texas Tech, another team looking to recover from an unexpected stumble. Saturday Afternoon #16 Oklahoma State 34, Iowa State 13 Pryor Commitment: Oftentimes, it felt as if Amir Pryor was in the Iowa State backfield every single play. The redshirt sophomore defensive tackle dominated a young and often overmatched interior line to the tune of 3 tackles for loss (4 total) and the only sack by either team in the game. While Kofi McCullough was able to find room to run if he could escape Pryor's initial rush, one meeting with him would on multiple occasions prove to be enough to put the Cyclones behind the sticks and stall out a drive entirely. Iowa State would finish the game 3-of-13 on third downs. B-Hive: Oklahoma State had a lot of contributions from a lot of players on Saturday, and I'm sure you can see the pattern between them. Ian Baldwin threw for a cool 228 yards and 2 touchdowns on 20-of-30 through the air, and Amral Brown added 20 carries for 109 yards and 2 more touchdowns. Downfield, Samuel Barfield led the team in catches with 6 (for just 53 yards, though) while Jeremy Bridges added 81 yards and a touchdown on 5 receptions. Even on defense, the trend continued (excluding Amir Pryor, of course). Daniel Brunson made his first career statsheet appearance with 4 tackles (1 for loss) from the strong safety position. Linebacker Amari Bradford had 7 tackles (1 for loss) and forced a fumble that teammate Mohamed Brice (4 tackles, 1 TFL) recovered. One might say that this team effort was un-b-lievable. Heavy Lifting: Kofi McCullough had a solid game: 25 carries for 125 yards and a touchdown, though he was responsible for the lost fumble. That brings him up to 769 yards and 8 touchdowns for the season on 5.2 yards per carry and 109.9 yards per game. And it hasn't been enough by any stretch of the imagination as Iowa State continues to struggle. Vaughn Sheppard is one of two Big XII quarterbacks averaging fewer than 150 passing yards per game, and he's the only active starter in the conference with an underwater TD/INT ratio. Ezekiel Renteria ranks 20th in the Big XII in receiving yardage and 21st in receptions--and yet he leads the team in both categories. That puts more and more of the weight of the offense on McCullough's shoulders until Sheppard and the whole passing system can show the same flashes displayed against Iowa in the Cyclones' only win of the season to date. Next Up: Iowa State comes back to Ames to take on Baylor, and at 1-6 their backs are pressed entirely up against the wall: one more loss eliminates them from bowl contention for the third straight year. Oklahoma State bounces back from their loss to TCU and has actually moved back into the Big XII title game picture. That would likely require them to win out and require Texas Tech to drop a game, but they can get started on that journey against an ice-cold Texas in Stillwater next week. Kansas 35, #20 Texas Tech 28 Graham Crackin': This year's been up-and-down at times for junior signal-caller Christian Graham, but he seems to have found his form in recent weeks. Against Texas Tech, he threw for a season-high 319 yards on 26-of-40 passing and matched a career-high with 4 touchdowns and no interceptions. And this time, it wasn't even a reliance on security blanket extraordinaire Jaime Bautista that pushed him over the top. Bautista certainly helped with 89 yards and a touchdown on 6 catches, but true freshman speedster Sebastian Thorpe had a career day: 9 catches for a career-high 102 yards and a touchdown. Graham also found sophomore Sebastian Christy and true freshman David Swenson for touchdowns as well. Kansas rolled up 28 points in the first half and finished with 35 for the game--the most Texas Tech has surrendered this season. Black and Red and Ran All Over: Despite the huge day from the Jayhawk offense, Texas Tech was within arm's length for the entire game thanks to a run game that the Jayhawks couldn't figure out how to stop. Solomon McLaughlin continued his upward trend with his best game in six weeks: 26 carries for 144 yards and 2 touchdowns, including a 31-yard score to close the gap to 7 points in the fourth quarter. He is now just 61 yards away from hitting 5,000 for his career and 9 rushing touchdowns away from matching Sterling Brown's Big XII record of 75. Complementing him was Hayden Dyer, who added 31 yards and his 3rd score of the season on 6 efficient carries. They bruised in short yardage, converting 6-of-14 third downs and a fourth down. And even quarterback Donald Garrett played off of them, rolling out for a touchdown pass to Atoshi Kanisawa off of play-action. If Texas Tech's run game keeps rounding back into form, watch out everybody else. Jam the Gaps: That's not to say Kansas's defense wasn't occasionally successful. The Jayhawks were often boom-or-bust on that side of the ball, with 7 tackles for loss and a sack and plenty of explosive plays allowed in return. When they were making plays, though, it was often Jamari Callahan in charge. He had 5 tackles (3 for loss), and a sack; Albert Duke (2 TFL), Adrian Henderson (1 TFL), and safety Noel Barfield (1 TFL) also made big plays in the backfield. And give Texas Tech's defense credit, too: they got pressure on Christian Graham. Samir Sample and Kahau Tupa'i both sacked him, Curtis Hunter batted down a pass--it just wasn't enough. Next Up: Kansas wins its third straight game (all on the road) to even their record at 4-4 (2-3). They'll get a bye before facing another tough matchup with Oklahoma State. Texas Tech falls to 6-2 (3-2) and will look to get back on track in Lubbock against a similarly stunned West Virginia. Saturday Evening #5 TCU 20, #3 Oklahoma 16 Roman's Revenge: It had been a bit of a quiet year to date for TCU star cornerback Roman Blackmon, who mainly just locked down man after man while teammate Patrick Ross racked up the picks. This time, though, Blackmon was challenged. On the one hand, Lucas Dykes racked up a team-best performance of 7 catches for 84 yards and a touchdown. On the other, Blackmon intercepted a pass in the fourth quarter that would essentially seal the deal. Joining him in a strong effort against the pass was Elliot McElmore, who intercepted his first pass of the season. TCU held the red-hot Eric Pope to 17-of-33 through the air for 199 yards, 1 touchdown, and 2 interceptions--the 100.1 passer rating was Pope's lowest of the season. White-Out: While Pope had a season-worst game through the air, the more impressive result from TCU's defense was forcing Maurice White into a career-worst game. The Big XII's all-time leader in rushing yards finished the game with just 70 yards on 18 carries and did not score a touchdown. The 70 yards is a career-low for White (and coincidentally leaves him 70 yards short of 6,000 for his career). It's just the second time that he's been relied upon as few as 18 times in a game, and the other was a 13-point effort in a loss to Oklahoma State last year. He snapped a streak of 12 straight games with a rushing touchdown, dating back to the Baylor game last year. And he finished with under 4.0 yards per carry for the first time in any game of his career. There just wasn't anything there for him. Hold the Fort: Despite being nearly zeroed out on the offensive end, Oklahoma fought for this game tooth-and-nail with a great defensive effort that made Felix Luck a non-factor (or even a negative factor) in the game. Linebacker Moises Contreras dropped back into coverage to pick him off once. Defensive end Max Abel tore into the backfield to sack and strip Luck on another occasion, and the forced fumble was recovered by safety Andrew Reaves. They held Luck to 15-of-30 passing for 145 yards and a touchdown with his two turnovers. At 94.9, it's Luck's lowest passer rating since putting up an 86.7 against Tennessee early last year, and it's the first time a TCU quarterback has failed to hit 150 yards in a game since Sam Milner's forgettable performance in the 2020 Big XII Championship Game. Win One for the Gifford: But what made the difference for TCU was that when the aerial attack was grounded, the ground game was flying. The same week as alumnus Bradley Cooley dazzled for the Atlanta Falcons, Martin Gifford pounded the rock to the tune of 109 yards and the go-ahead touchdown on 22 carries to essentially underpin the entire TCU offense. It's the fourth time Gifford has rushed for at least 100 yards on 4.9 yards or more per carry; no TCU back has hit 100 rushing yards on 4.5 yards a pop (let alone 4.9) four times in a season since Cooley did it in 2017. This is officially a multidimensional offense, which means it's officially a dangerous offense. Back and Forth: The Department of Obscure Big XII Statistics brings you this unusual fact. This was a back-and-forth game to the point that the lead changed hands every quarter, and it turns out that's pretty rare even in the nation's most exciting conference. It's just the 6th time a Big XII team has trailed after 15 minutes, led at the half, trailed after three quarters, and then gone on to win. That's even rarer in the opposite direction: it's just the 2nd time a Big XII team has led after 1, trailed after 2, led after 3, and still gone on to lose. Double or Nothing?: TCU's win leaves them undefeated in conference play while Oklahoma sits alone in second place with 1 loss (thanks to Texas Tech and West Virginia each picking up a second conference loss this week). With TCU owning a win over Oklahoma State and Oklahoma owning a win over Texas Tech, the odds are pretty solid that these two teams haven't seen the last of each other. Last year's rematch saw TCU get revenge on Oklahoma State to earn a playoff bid and their first conference title; the stakes will likely be similar if TCU and Oklahoma earn a rematch at season's end. Next Up: Oklahoma becomes the last Big XII team to fall from the ranks of the undefeated at 7-1 (4-1), and they will try to take it out on a Kansas State team that they've beaten 8 times in 8 attempts. TCU, meanwhile, improves to 7-1 (6-0) and will have their third bye week of the season next. If West Virginia defeats Texas Tech this upcoming week, then TCU will have their first opportunity to clinch a third straight Big XII Championship Game appearance the following week at West Virginia. Byes: Kansas State (2-5), Texas (4-3)
  20. stormstopper

    [2022] CFBHC Injury Report

    This is really late in coming, but this is now prepped and up to date through week 10. I'll do my best to keep it updated through the rest of the season: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1G1ruXOBaj6pEoQsiJxzeul9S5ty4g58pxb-V-1FdasU/edit?usp=sharing
  21. stormstopper

    [2022] Week #10 - 1 PM

    Wow, Anthony Harris couldn't even hit one upright? Clearly not cut out to be a Bears kicker. All seriousness, first real big game from Abraham! Peter Foster with special teams magic coming back from injury! No turnovers and just one sack allowed! Good team win!
  22. stormstopper

    [2022] Week #10 - Saturday Night

    Two shutouts in this timeslot mean 3 shutouts this week, the second straight week that's happened. First time with 3+ shutouts in consecutive weeks since weeks 11-12 of the 2019 season.
  23. stormstopper

    [2022] Week #10 - Saturday Evening

    Because they only work in reverse on WVU
  24. stormstopper

    [2022] Week #10 - Saturday Evening

    Tulsa Bowl-den Hurricane
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