• Announcements

    • Soluna

      Upcoming Schedule   05/26/2017

      NFLHC Week #8 - May 28/29, then everything resuming as normal the following week. Recruiting due on June 3rd.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Soluna

Gameplan Monday #3

19 posts in this topic

Today's question for people who have coached either CFBHC/NFLHC?

 

  • When you create your weekly gameplan do you: 1) look for mismatches with the opponent and tweak your regular plan, 2) keep the same plan you always do, consistency wins, or 3) not look at the opponent and tweak your team towards its strengths? Why?
  • How much game-planning do you do for your upcoming games? Do you prepare ahead or only do it for the active week?
bingo415 likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I probably do more "scouting" later on in the season. Weirdly my win total in the beginning of seasons in cfbhc is better than the end of seasons but I'd guess my win percentage in NFLHC is better in the 2nd half of seasons. Injuries play a part in that too. I've never had a "dominant" team or individual player that can impose my will and force teams to adjust to me so I probably am more of an adjuster. The Vikings with Vardell and Henson were a nightmare to play so I always had to try to matchup against them which was harder than any other team. If I were a team like them I'd probably just dare the other team to stop me more. Same with guys like Skaggs. But my QBs in NFLHC have been Harold Simmons, Vamos Ramos, Larry Haynes, and Norris Brooksheer and my RBs have been Rickie Baird and the 2 Quincy's so I've always had to tinker more.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Personally, in CFBHC I try and have a sort of default gameplan and make small changes from there. The two sliders I play with the most are WR routes and CB coverage. I switched a lot between press/man coverage last season depending on run/pass instead of fully committing to playing the run/pass because my base defense was the heart of my team. The versatility of my starters meant I would rather them play over putting a different 11 players on the field. I also thought it was useful for teams that I thought might run but I didnt want to commit fully and get beat over the top if I guessed wrong. 

 

For offense, I like having one speed and one target WR to allow my passing attack to effectively attack the opponents weakest level with players that excel with those types of routes. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Generally #2, especially in the early part of the season when I'm still figuring things through and I'd rather know what I'm doing before I worry too much about the other team; howeve,r this strategy partially led to my downfall in NFLHC.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't care to go into complete detail about how I gameplan when I'm actually an active coach but I, and now Sleuth to a degree, do something that I think is unique. New England has been surprisingly blessed with smart QBs with good decision making skills though they make lack other skills. I think if you have a QB that can spread the ball and go through their checkdowns it's in your favor to mess with your WR Corps and put them in front of the corners they're most likely to burn through. Your starting CB is a stud but your #2 is trash? - let's move our WR1 to WR2 and have him dust your garbage corner. One corner is 5-8? - Let's put our 6-5 guy on him.

 

I think there's little things you can do to help your QB, especially a QB like Lawyer who may lack accuracy in exchange for good intelligence. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I always look for some sort of mismatch on the opposing team. I feel like a big part of my "success" at CMU and NCSU is just finding mismatches and doing my best to expose them. Of course, your players have to be capable of doing this, which mine have shown mixed results normally (Blake Fry does not have the arm to throw deep). I genuinely feel that looking for mismatches with potentially weaker squads is the best approach. This could totally be different for teams in the upper echelon of college football.

 

I actually do a lot of gameplanning the week of the game. I tend to get it out of the way early because I hate second-guessing myself at the last minute, and that's what leads to nervous breakdowns and potentially spoiled results. Most of the gameplanning is for the active week, although I have gameplanned for the future (ex. switching to a 4-3 during the Georgia State game to prepare for UNC, Cuse, BC, and Wake). 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I usually have a core gameplan that won't deviate from week-to-week unless I need to make a major change. I've changed primary offensive scheme mid-season four times ever (2015 when I was 2-3 and needed a jolt, 2016 when I put Eric Jennings in the starting lineup, and consecutive weeks in 2018 which I now regret), and I've never changed my primary defense scheme at all. Aggressiveness, play proportion, tempo, and coverage all go in that core basket. I also put rushing style in there, though I'm not necessarily sure that's where it needs to be. I absolutely tailor routes, blitzing, and playing the pass/run to opponent--though again, I'm not sure whether blitzing should be in that basket either.

 

I've learned the hard way that consistency matters, and that it's a bad idea to get cute with my gameplan. I attribute the two most unnecessary losses I've ever taken (the Kansas State debacle that cost me a division title in 2015, the ECU game that cost me a top-25 ranking in 2019) to gameplan decisions that deviated from what I'd been doing all season up to that point. Consistency absolutely matters, and I'm of the mind that when you find a good gameplan you stick with it come hell or high water.

 

I gameplan for my opponents long in advance, and that process begins during game week then I consider myself unprepared. Any time I look at someone's depth chart, I quickly think of what I'd run against them whether I'm playing them or not. If I'm actually playing them, I make sure to familiarize myself with them. If it's Missouri, Kansas State, Oklahoma, and TCU specifically, I make it a point to begin planning for them before the season even starts. Heck, I don't even play Missouri this year and I'm still thinking about how I'd plan against them if we happened to meet in a bowl game. I like to at least get a grip on all my opponents' basic tendencies by observation throughout the season (writing media and keeping stats helps me with that), and then when I get within 7-14 days of the actual game I'll go in and collect a detailed analysis of their team and its constituent parts so that I can finally put together the actual gameplan. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the biggest lesson I've learned from CFBHC is consistency rules and play to your teams strengths. In CFBHC I've only changed primary offensive schemes once during the season when things were going really bad. I really only change minor sliders week-to-week, e.g. play proportion, aggressiveness, passing routes, and defensive set. In college I've never had good enough corners to run press, but generally man/zone is decided by how good the opposing team is and how good my corners are. I notice certain players play well with certain slider sets, for example last year I found a slider set that always got my tight end involved so I mostly stuck with that because he would exploit most defenses -- and when on to be 1st team All-AAC. In that slider set my QB was generally way more accurate too, so I rarely moved from it unless there was a big mismatch to exploit. Like I said, consistency is king, so I rarely plan beyond the current week's game. The only time I look ahead is if I know I need to make large changes, and I want the penalty to fall against a certain team.

 

I think with the new NFLHC gameplan there is a bit more room for more  targeted tweaking. I will often change the secondary offense to exploit matchups and some of the more minor sliders. The big lesson on defense, especially with a not great secondary, has been keep it simple stupid. In 2019, when the Titans had the second worst pass defense in the league, I was constantly changing things to the teams detriment. Now on defense my gameplan leans on, lets keep things consistent and simple for the secondary and play to the teams strenghts, especially as we are training a new starting rookie. Still don't have a great defense, but it is much improved and I think that philosophy is the reason why. Ultimately it comes down to, do you have highly skilled/adaptable players that can handle week-to-week change, or will they benefit more from playing in a system that builds on their strengths? That is a personnel question to me. 

smckenz3 likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, AzulCaballero said:

I don't care to go into complete detail about how I gameplan when I'm actually an active coach but I, and now Sleuth to a degree, do something that I think is unique. New England has been surprisingly blessed with smart QBs with good decision making skills though they make lack other skills. I think if you have a QB that can spread the ball and go through their checkdowns it's in your favor to mess with your WR Corps and put them in front of the corners they're most likely to burn through. Your starting CB is a stud but your #2 is trash? - let's move our WR1 to WR2 and have him dust your garbage corner. One corner is 5-8? - Let's put our 6-5 guy on him.

 

I think there's little things you can do to help your QB, especially a QB like Lawyer who may lack accuracy in exchange for good intelligence. 

 

I actually think the Patriots are doing poorly this year because you're moving WR around for literally no reason. Having Beckham at #3 really hurt you.

TheTodd15 likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

CFBHC is a bit different than NFLHC for me, though a couple things translate. 

 

I almost always build a team toward the way I want to play. Thus, my game plan is more or less consistent game to game as well as season to season. Moving from Minnesota to Oregon is going to be, by far, the biggest departure from that consistency. I change sliders to attack the oppositions weakest point in the passing attack while generally keeping my run game sliders the same, assuming decent production. On defense, I will move smaller things that should help me achieve a broader goal: I want to put more pressure on Team A? Move this slider and this slider. I want to let them throw the ball short? Move this slider and this slider. But generally, my teams know what we'll be playing in the context of the season and week-to-week. 

 

I'll look ahead occasionally, especially for rivalry games. I'm already trying certain things in advance of the OAK-DEN match-up and will do the same building up to the Washington and Washington State games. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I keep the same scheme, but I normally tweak minor things such as run frequency depending on who I am facing for that week. I will target weaknesses in their defense even if it doesnt go well with my current scheme

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

When you create your weekly gameplan do you: 1) look for mismatches with the opponent and tweak your regular plan, 2) keep the same plan you always do, consistency wins, or 3) not look at the opponent and tweak your team towards its strengths? Why?

 

At each of my four stops in CFBHC and NFLHC (combined), I have looked at the roster and looked at that my teams possible "default" gameplan is. This totally ignores any possible opponent - instead I look exclusively at what I have and I tailor the overall strategy around it. This broadly determines the gameplan for the season. Ezekiel Adams got 35 carries a game in a slow grinding offense because that was the best I could do at Illinois. The gameplan last year for Jeremy Henry received modifications different from what Darrell Murphy would have, because Henry isn't capable of what Murphy is.

 

From there, I look at the strengths and weaknesses of an opponent, and tailor the boilerplate gameplan around that. That said, some weeks I change nothing or barely anything, and some weeks I make a lot of slider changes. I really don't move depth charts around all that much unless a player is extremely under-performing. 


 

Quote

How much game-planning do you do for your upcoming games? Do you prepare ahead or only do it for the active week?

 

I only plan for the active week, doing what is listed above. The only thing I somewhat plan ahead for is injuries, which is an NFLHC concern only.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you guys feel like people are too conservative with changing schemes midseason or even in the offseason if they have the same core players? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like to exchange gameplans after games with OOC opponents, its like trading game tape irl. If I have a weakness against powerful pass defenses, and it's obvious I'm going to have to run, i like to know if they committed to the run, or just stayed back in what they excelled at, so that when I play a similar team in conference, i can kinda know what they're going to do.

 

Also i learned from imposter to, when playing Toledo, do the exact opposite expected of you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In NFLHC I've noticed that drastically switching the secondary scheme can sometimes result in injury, so I try to avoid any type of changes to scheme if possible. I always target weaker areas of the other teams defense, and I've found what options work well with certain players.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I generally target the weakness of the team I'm playing but keep the vast majority of my gameplan the same.

 

I also generally only look at my next opponent unless I'm struggling and I'm thinking of a scheme change, in which case I might time my scheme change to either a team much stronger than me and take the L but set myself up for the rest of the season, or do it versus a team I think I can beat regardless of scheme change or not. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nearly all of my game planning for UCF occurs between posting my depth chart and the first game of the season. I start completely from scratch from the previous year and reevaluate my roster from the ground up and come up with a plan that 1) emphasizes the positions that I'm strong at and 2) puts my best players on the field. Now, this is my 5th season and each year I've had a 5.0 Power RB as the focal point of my offense, as it will be again this year, but come next year after DNJ graduates I will very likely end up doing something completely different for at least a season. 

 

I really don't do very much in-depth scouting into other teams. There are a couple options that I may flip after a quick glance over my opponent's depth chart or previous game's stats, but I've found that whenever I try to get clever or fake-out another team, I get creamed. UCF's offense is very simple: DNJ will run for over 100 yards and a couple TD's, a WR or TE will also get a TD, and Gavin Sewell will kick a one or two FG's. When I start changing things each week, that gets messed up.

 

Of course, this is all also assuming a season isn't going catastrophically. In my four seasons so far my worst start has been 1-3, and my worst record has been 7-5 with a bowl win, with the best being 10-2 AAC Champs plus a play-in win. I haven't exactly been a Top 10 team, but hey, consistency is worth something.

DescretoBurrito likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've learned to gameplan to the team you have, and not the team you want to be. It's why I was so run heavy for so long, that's what worked with the pieces I had. I tried to force the spread and pistol in 2014 (spread until Boise St, IIRC) and 2015 (pistol start to finish). Accepting I had a smash mouth team lead to more success. I currently stick with one scheme for the whole season, but tweak the sliders every week to try and exploit mismatches.

 

Many seasons ago I would keep a running document of all my opponents games. So week 1 I tracked 12 teams, week 2 I tracked 11, and so on. I gave up on this and currently just look back at my next opponents last several games. I focus on one opponent every week.

 

I don't actually consider myself more than just OK as a gameplanner. I guess only Soluna would know how true that is.

UBL likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, DescretoBurrito said:

I've learned to gameplan to the team you have, and not the team you want to be.

 

I focus on one opponent every week.

 

I don't actually consider myself more than just OK as a gameplanner. I guess only Soluna would know how true that is.

Exactly the same here, and I think a lot of people here do and feel the same way. Recruit for the team you want, gameplan for the team you have. And gameplanning isn't some complex 4D chess either, look at the last couple games + depth chart and you pretty much know what you're up against (obviously only once you're well into the season)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

About us

CFBHC.com was founded on December 6th, 2013.

CFBHC Standings

2019 CFBHC Standings

 

NFLHC Standings

2019 NFLHC Standings

Social Network